VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Time sensitive announcements and any discussion that doesn't seem to fit anywhere else.

Moderators: BarbaraSher, Tituba

FREE \"STUFF\"

Postby songpoet » Fri Mar 16, 2007 6:34 pm

I don't think I mentioned this before on this thread,,,,,,,,,but i'd be interested to know how many of you would ever consider; \"DUMPSTER DIVING\"???? :shock: http://www.dirtcheapbuilder.com/artscienofdu1.html You'd be surprised how many well-to-do folks do!!! :idea:
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Re: FREE \"STUFF\"

Postby Scenario Thinker » Sat Mar 17, 2007 5:18 am

And the guy gets $15 for his book. Maybe we can find it free in a dumpster :)
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Takin Care of Business,,,,,,,,,,Everyday

Postby songpoet » Thu Mar 22, 2007 6:23 pm

Scenerio,,,,,,,,,,,I know you jest,,,,,,, but (ya never know.) :wink: I found a $430. ITEM (in Like NEW Condition) only one thing opened in it, in a dumpster! 8) Remember folks in a world of \"WASTE\" there's a lot of ways to \"SAVE\"! :idea:
Last edited by songpoet on Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Postby Dena » Tue Mar 27, 2007 8:53 am

Found this article on http://www.stretcher.com My Story: The Carfree Couple contributed by Sharon Recently, a friend gave me a newspaper clipping with the headline \"Family steers clear of cars.\" The article, written by Sonia Krishnan of The Seattle Times, was about a suburban family of four who managed without an automobile for almost 20 years. My friend knew I'd love reading about other people like me, people who embrace the idea of living without a car. My husband and I bicycle or walk wherever and whenever we can. I walk to the bank, the mall, and the grocery store (I carry groceries home in a large plastic backpack). I used to take public transportation to my job downtown before becoming a telecommuter. According to his bicycle odometer, my spouse logs in 2,000 miles a year commuting to work, running errands, and cycling on recreational trails. His 15-speed Trek is a familiar sight in the parking lot of the company where he's worked for the last 20 years. He will ride his bike to work in any kind of weather with the exception of snowstorms. Why do we resist dependence on a car? There are so many reasons. We want to save money. We want to fit exercise into our busy schedules. We want to escape the stress of dense Chicago traffic. There are also emotional reasons not to drive. Being a highly sensitive person, I've never quite gotten used to the sounds and smells of rush hour. When stuck in traffic, it is hard not to wish yourself someplace else. What a waste of life! The emotional reasons for avoiding driving made me think back to my first date with my husband. Twenty-two years ago, he came over to my apartment on his bicycle. He explained that his green Fiat had broken down six months ago and he hadn't gotten around to fixing it yet. That night we walked a couple of miles to a pizza place. Afterwards, we walked and talked and walked some more. I had a wonderful time. I'd found my soulmate, someone who liked to walk and hike and bike as much as I did. The family in the newspaper article totally kicked the car habit. Alas, I cannot say the same. Although for the first four years of our marriage we did not own a car, we now own two cars. One is a 16-year-old Escort that we used in bad weather to get us to places not accessible by bus. The other is a gas-guzzling Dodge Durango that Al inherited from his father a couple of months ago. My father-in-law, who just moved into a nursing home, made us promise to keep his Durango for a while for sentimental reasons. (This huge car can accommodate his wheelchair and he likes it when we take him for an outing in it.) We honor his wishes, but it feels a little strange to be riding around in such a big car. It is just not our usual way of doing things. Not our style at all. ________________________________________ \"My Story\" is a regular feature of The Dollar Stretcher. If you have a story that could help save time or money please send it by mailto:MyStory@stretcher.com.
Dena
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2003 10:01 pm
Location: Missouri

Postby Dena » Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:03 am

Another story from http://www.stretcher.com My Story: Living Abroad contributed by Tina Living abroad is an exciting and challenging experience, especially if you're on a budget. Nine years ago, I moved from Seattle to Amsterdam, and over time, I have discovered cheaper and more environmentally friendly ways of doing things. For example, I use my bicycle or public transport to get around. Instead of buying magazines or newspapers, I go to the library or a cafe that features a reading table. I also borrow reading material from friends. I buy fresh produce at outside markets and ethnic stores. The quality is fine and the prices are much lower. For entertainment, I go to free concerts, visit a museum (I have an annual pass), or take a walk in the park. I think it's a lot of fun to see how far I can make my money stretch. Here are a few other helpful hints: String Me a Line Many people here don't have clothes dryers. They use a clothesline or a drying rack instead. Electric dryers are comparably expensive to use, so these methods are a thrifty alternative. I have also found that my clothes stay in better condition longer if I let them air dry. However, this method does require occasional ironing. BYOB (Bring Your Own Bags) Supermarkets here don't provide bags to put your groceries in. You have to buy them. So I bring my own bags--cotton or canvas totes or plastic bags with sturdy handles. I also always have a folded-up plastic bag in my purse in case I run across any great bargains. Bringing your own bags is also good for the environment. Some grocery stores in the U.S. give you a discount (often five cents) if you bring your own bags. Plan for Presents When I make my annual trip (off-season, if possible) to the U.S. to see my family, I bring Christmas and birthday presents with me. Of course, this requires advance planning, but it also saves a lot of money on postage costs. The year I gave everyone souvenir coffee mugs was good for a laugh. I got a very strange look from the x-ray machine operator at the airport when he saw the eight coffee mugs packed in my suitcase. This is also a good tip for those who have relatives who live across the country. Just make sure they don't open their presents until they are supposed to! Two Simple Money Savers: The Hot Water Bottle and the Thermos My apartment does not have central heating (the place is old), and my bedroom is not heated. I just about froze to death my first winter here. I was overjoyed when I rediscovered the hot water bottle, which is a simple and cheap alternative to an electric blanket. I just put one (or two, if it's really cold) in my bed on winter evenings about an hour before retiring. They are also great to curl up with on the couch with a blanket while watching a movie. Saves on heating costs too! The thermos is another old-fashioned money saver. I take it with me on long train trips instead of buying expensive coffee in the train. It's also great for a picnic in the park or a day out. I've also used it to bring soup to a sick friend in the hospital. Before filling the thermos, I pour in boiling water to heat it up. The contents stay hot longer. My life is very simple, which allows me to work part time and spend time with friends and do more of the things I enjoy. I also try to make choices that are good for the environment. For me, that's the point. Enjoy life and be kind to each other and the earth. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- \"My Story\" is a regular feature of The Dollar Stretcher. If you have a story that could help save time or money please send it to MyStory@stretcher.com
Dena
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2003 10:01 pm
Location: Missouri

Postby Tituba » Mon Apr 16, 2007 7:18 am

Tituba
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 9627
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:01 pm
Location: North Shore - Boston

LETTERS

Postby songpoet » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:31 pm

A woman 23 yrs. old, married, in a small city out west writes; I quit my 40 hour a week slavery and got a 20 hour a week job that I love (working in a library). I started learning how to grow food in the city and make compost. I became conscious of what I was eating and how I was spending my money. I started learning to sew, mend, and shop secondhand, and i've stopped eating meat. from Voluntary Simplicity by Duane Elgin :idea:
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Bump didee Bump

Postby songpoet » Thu Oct 18, 2007 6:06 pm

Just a gentle bump up. I still think that Voluntary Simplicity is at the secular "CORE" of all that can be successful in our life,,,,,,,,,,in multitudinous ways!
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Re: Bump didee Bump

Postby tennisany1 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 3:05 pm

songpoet wrote:Just a gentle bump up. I still think that Voluntary Simplicity is at the secular "CORE" of all that can be successful in our life,,,,,,,,,,in multitudinous ways!
Well said. Though this thread deals with many of the material aspects of life, I think it applies to other areas of our lives as well. This site and many posters here have really helped me focus on the things that are important to me and shut off all of the other stuff that clutters my daily life. I realized that only a small part of my life was being spent doing and thinking about things that I enjoyed and was interested in and I had to change that. I have a long way to go, but everyday I try to recapture the parts of my life that bring me joy and I lost when I "grew up". I really want to wake up in the morning and look forward to my day.... I remember this feeling but it feels like it was such a long time ago.
You must remember to tell people that you are just learning...... http://tennisany1.wordpress.com/
tennisany1
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 8:51 am

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby songpoet » Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:31 pm

tennisany1 wrote:everyday I try to recapture the parts of my life that bring me joy and I lost when I "grew up". I really want to wake up in the morning and look forward to my day.... I remember this feeling but it feels like it was such a long time ago.
Hi tennisany1,,,,,,,,your quote above is at the "essence" of what simplifying LIFE "is"! I'm certainly no expert at this but I continue to look intently at it & apply it to the best of my ability & circumstances. I only know when I immerse my mind in the concept of it, & look at the living examples of it's practical application, a beautiful calming & inspiring feeling washes over me! 8) Like you I want to "FEEL" that everyday for the rest of my life! :)
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby kashtanka » Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:54 pm

My newest idea about simplifying my life doesn't have to do with saving money, but to buy things for others who are less fortunate instead of myself. For example, I was talking to a woman today (my husband's ex) and she mentioned that she doesn't have a DVD player! What was my first thought? I'll buy her one! This way, I am helping someone else, and at the same time not bringing anything new into my house. I buy a lot of clothes at secondhand shops, and combined with other clothes I buy for the year I probably spend about $300. I don't buy any processed food...a big money saver. My husband and I drive economy cars, and drive them until they're beat. (As a matter of fact, my husband's car engine blew last month, after getting over 400,000 miles of use from it) We live pretty simply, don't have showy things, haven't taken a vacation in 15 years (we may take one this year though, because for the first time ever, my husband is going to take three weeks off), have lots of old but still functioning, things like TV and regular telephone (no cordless). I told my brother the other day that my husband and I live like paupers even though we aren't!
kashtanka
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1749
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 9:15 pm
Location: New York

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby Tituba » Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:58 am

I've been trying to drive the speed limit. Aggggggggg. The street in front of my house is 30mph. It is so difficult for me to go that slow. Even though the speed limit on the highway is 65, most people are clocking in well over 75 on the stretch to my exit. I've been going 65 and people fly by me. Well, I'm working on it.
Tituba
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 9627
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:01 pm
Location: North Shore - Boston

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby songpoet » Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:37 pm

Hi Kashtanka,,,,,,,,,,,I wish we had a "smilie" with the applause sign!!! Everything you are doing is in alignment with VS ! Congrats especially on your understanding to make your "Vehicle" last as long as possible ,,,wow 400,000 miles . You get the Mr. & Mrs. GREEN award :mrgreen: I wish I could get by with a bicycle (but I can't in my business.) But i've stretched my Toyota to; 228,000 :wink: I also buy used as much as humanly possible incl. clothing. And I too hate to see someone go without something & get it for them if I can. Along those lines I have an Idea for a "FINDER'S SERVICE" (see Income Streams) where the Idea is creative "recycling" at it's core & a nice sideline idea to help pay the bills (that might be a lot of fun to boot!!!) You can't feel "GUILTY" about taking a VACATION (that's a necessity for the soul). :) From where you are take a spring or Fall Vacation to the MAINE coast ! (Cheaper Rates & the beach is all yours with no crowds!) I did it for about 10 years until my divorce. I desperately want to get back,,,,,,,,,it seems to wreak of the "Way Life Oughtta Be"!!! Tituba I hear ya,,,,,,,,,it's hard to NOT push the limits with the peddle, but If we gave it the Old College Try maybe we'd save a lot more petrol than we otherwise believe is possible? I'd love to hear from you gals on Dollar Saving Healthy Recipes from scratch! That's an area I need to look more seriously at!
songpoet
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 634
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:01 pm

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby Tituba » Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:00 pm

My reason for driving the speed limit has nothing to do with global warming. It is the price of gasoline.... My motives are greed.
Tituba
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 9627
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:01 pm
Location: North Shore - Boston

Re: VOLUNTARY SIMPLICITY

Postby kashtanka » Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:46 pm

Songpoet, thanks for your kind words! :) You're also doing great with stretching out the life span of an expensive but sometimes necessary item. Toyotas are beauties when it comes to having long motor lives! When I was growing up, I lived about a block from the main street in town, and could bicycle everwhere and it was great. Ours was a one car family. (With 10 kids) About taking a trip to Maine, a girlfriend of mine (who I had lost touch with for about 25 years and I looked her up about 6 months ago) said that she goes to Maine every spring, and wants me to come with her this year. She said it's the most beautiful place that she's ever been to on vacation, and it's not that expensive, as you pointed out. So, it's a possiblity. Maybe I could go with her and get to know a few places, and then bring my husband. I always have the best time when I'm with him! Thanks for pointing out the thread you started on Income Streams....I will check it out now.
kashtanka
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1749
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 9:15 pm
Location: New York

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests