California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Mon Nov 07, 2016 12:22 am

I've done all the research I can. I just ordered something. I'll receive it in about 10 days. If I don't like it, I can always return it. Keeping my fingers crossed.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Mon Nov 07, 2016 3:17 pm

inspiresuccess wrote:
SquarePeg wrote: I am using a lamp right at this very moment to treat SAD. It uses LEDs.
http://sadlightshq.net/review-sphere-ga ... sad-light/
SQ, How long have you been using it? Do you think it works well? It seems tiny compared to the one I have.

I've had mine for about 30 years. It's the size of a large briefcase, is made of a beautiful wood with a brass handle. Like they say, "They don't make 'em like they used to"! The disadvantage is in a small apartment like mine it takes a huge amount of space. But I don't feel like forking over $65 for something I own that works well. It must be LED. I've only changed the bulbs once in 30 years.

EG. I hope you will consider giving it a try. SQ do you know if they have a 30 day money back guarantee?
Yes, it's tiny, but that's a good thing because I take it with me to use at work M-F, and use it at home on the weekends. (But now my wife wants to use it, too.) I bought it about one year ago. I use it in the afternoon to "extend the day" and I think it works well for that. It's especially important today because 5pm today is as late as 6pm was last week due to the end of daylight savings time. I'd just about collapse from exhaustion when I get home.

I doubt that your briefcase SAD light is LED. Full spectrum LED light was still experimental in the 1990s. (When they finally figured out how to made a blue LED, they still had to contend with power handling.) So there's no way a 30 year old commercial product would feature LED. It's probably fluorescent tube, which, BTW change in intensity (fade) over time.

I'm really glad devices like this are available without a prescription. Let's hope it stays that way.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:01 pm

SquarePeg wrote: It's probably fluorescent tube, which, BTW change in intensity (fade) over time. I'm really glad devices like this are available without a prescription.


I was wondering if I should get new bulbs. They're so expensive. The ones I have still seem really, really bright.

30 years ago I did have to have a prescription for it. It is good that's no longer required.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Wed Nov 09, 2016 6:37 pm

I received the magnifying lamp today. I'd like to return it but it's so heavy it's probably going to cost me $50 in shipping costs. It works great except for the fact that the magnification is too strong. It has to do with that thing mentioned in the article about sacrificing the overall size of what you're look at. It says it can be used for reading but because of the high magnification, it only shows about half of a paper back book page. I suppose people who read on their phones or Kindles or whatever are used to that. Since I'm not using any of that I don't know about it.

As far as stitching with it, I have to have the lens so close to the object I don't have room to pull the stitch up without bumping into the magnifier. This is why it's so hard not to buy these things in a store and return them. The shipping cost is so high. I'll continue to work with it to see if there is any way I can get it to work for me. When I get my new bifocals it might help also but I won't be getting those before the 30 day return comes up.

I'll try to work with it more. I do think the 3 diopter would be best. I wish this company had the same lamp but with 3 diopter, but they don't. I'd have to do my research all over again.

Aside from the magnification being too strong, it's really well made. The option of changing the power of the light is really nice. I would recommend it to someone who wants this level of magnification.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby Elaine Glimme » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:18 am

I'm absorbing all of the great info you two are posting.

I'm probably going to order the lamp SQ recommends.

How do you use it? Do you sit and stare at it for twenty minutes? Can you just point it at your face and watch TV? How far from your face should the light be?

Let me explain. The reason Tom can't sleep is that my mother in law falls down when she tries to walk by herself. So when she's awake, Tom's awake. When she wants to use the commode, Tom has to wake up and help her. Think back to having a newborn and getting up every two hours to feed him/her. Except it's more like every one to two hours. So it's easier for Tom to just sleep during the day, and stay awake while he's watching his mother in law. And of course there are things that Tom has to do during the day, so his sleeping time is very limited. That's why I want to get the lamp for my mother in law. If she could sleep for three or four hours straight, Tom could actually get some sleep at night to supplement what sleep he gets during the day.

My mother in law gets almost no natural sunlight. She only gets out to go to the doctor or to get a haircut. The only light she gets is through a window, which, of course filters out UV.

Anyway, I'm not sure i could get my mother in law to stare at a lamp for twenty minutes, but if pointing it at her face while she watches TV would work, I could probably do that. Or if I could point it at her face while we eat lunch, I could do that. I'd probably say it's for me, and I'm trying something new to help me sleep. She's really pretty sweet, and, considering everything, easy to please. (Tom, being her son, would disagree.) But staring at a lamp seems a little weird, even to me. And I'm willing to try a lot of things.

Having a full spectrum bulb in a lamp she normally uses all day would work. Is there any way to do that? I know it's not what you're talking about, but it would be an easier sell.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby Elaine Glimme » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:20 am

I'm absorbing all of the great info you two are posting.

I'm probably going to order the lamp SQ recommends.

How do you use it? Do you sit and stare at it for twenty minutes? Can you just point it at your face and watch TV? How far from your face should the light be?

Let me explain. The reason Tom can't sleep is that my mother in law falls down when she tries to walk by herself. So when she's awake, Tom's awake. When she wants to use the commode, Tom has to wake up and help her. Think back to having a newborn and getting up every two hours to feed him/her. Except it's more like every one to two hours. So it's easier for Tom to just sleep during the day, and stay awake while he's watching his mother. And of course there are things that Tom has to do during the day, so his sleeping time is very limited. That's why I want to get the lamp for my mother in law. If she could sleep for three or four hours straight, Tom could actually get some sleep at night to supplement what sleep he gets during the day.

My mother in law gets almost no natural sunlight. She only gets out to go to the doctor or to get a haircut. The only light she gets is through a window, which, of course filters out UV.

Anyway, I'm not sure i could get my mother in law to stare at a lamp for twenty minutes, but if pointing it at her face while she watches TV would work, I could probably do that. Or if I could point it at her face while we eat lunch, I could do that. I'd probably say it's for me, and I'm trying something new to help me sleep. She's really pretty sweet, and, considering everything, easy to please. (Tom, being her son, would disagree.) But staring at a lamp seems a little weird, even to me. And I'm willing to try a lot of things.

Having a full spectrum bulb in a lamp she normally uses all day would work. Is there any way to do that? I know it's not what you're talking about, but it would be an easier sell.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:57 am

EG,

You don't sit and stare at it for 20 minutes. Think of it like sunlight. You don't sit and stare directly at the sun. But when you're outside, you're looking around at the sunlight. So, if you're reading with the lamp in front of you, you just glance up at it directly from time to time the same way you might glance up at the sun from time to time. It's the equivalent of exposure to sunlight. In order for your body to produce Vitamin D in the body, you have to have your eyes exposed to sunlight -- not by staring directly at the sun but having enough sunlight exposure that it can enter through your eyes.

What does your MIL do all day? If she reads for 20 minutes a day that would be ideal. Then she could be using the LB for light. Does she do anything besides watch TV? Does she cook? It could be next to her on the kitchen counter. Does she sew? What does she do for 20 minutes that requires good lighting? Think in those terms.

You don't have to tell her it's to help her sleep. It's a very bright light. You could just tell her it's a light you found that's brighter than most and helps people see better. Because it's so bright, you don't want to overdo it. 20 minutes per day is maximum. Like too much sun can give you sun burn, too much looking at bright sun can hurt your eyes.

Even if she doesn't like it, Tom can use it. Like I mentioned before, people who work night shifts, etc. use it to reset their circadian rhythms. It could make him feel better because he's sleeping during the day and not getting enough natural light. The LB can balance that out.

I'm glad you're willing to give it a try. SQ can give you more info on how he uses his and for how long. I use mine in a different way than most people do because of the severity of my SAD. I don't recommend people using it the way I do.

EG, if you or someone else reading this would do me a favor, I'd appreciate it. Google resetting your circadian rhythm and find out how long it takes to reset it. That would let you know if a 30 day return policy would give Tom or MIL time to know if it helps before returning it. Besides, I'd like to know, too!
Good luck!
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Thu Nov 10, 2016 2:54 pm

Again, I'm using the light right now.

It's about 12 inches in front of the monitor and about 18 inches away from my eyes. I'm looking over it when I look at the monitor. I do not look directly at it, but it does shine into both eyes, and it's aimed directly at my eyes.

If I were to try to read a book while using this light, I'd need a second light source to shine on the book.

I wear glasses, and I see a lot of glare and reflections across the lenses of my glasses when I use the light. (I don't buy the anti-glare coatings). And if the glasses are dusty or dirty, there is additional interference, like looking through a dirty windshield while driving into the sun.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Thu Nov 10, 2016 3:10 pm

I don't use the light the way inspiresuccess describes it. I aim the light directly into my eyes. I don't use it to illuminate the objects I look at.

Here's a link to some interesting advice about resetting circadian rhythm:
http://valleysleepcenter.com/can-you-co ... an-rhythm/
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Thu Nov 10, 2016 3:19 pm

Here's a link to a FAQ page created by the maker of the light I use:
http://lightphorialamp.net/faq

Here's a link to the manual:
http://lightphorialamp.com/instructions.pdf

In the Jet Lag section of the manual, it recommends just one day's use to prevent jet lag from an Eastbound trip across just a few time zones.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:01 pm

SquarePeg wrote:I don't use the light the way inspiresuccess describes it. I aim the light directly into my eyes.


I think we're saying the same thing. I haven't described how I use it because I use it in an unusual way that I think would confuse people. What I'm saying here is how other people say they use it and how I think EG's MIL and hubbie could use it, too. What I'm saying is what you HAVE TO DO -- is look at it directly some of the time in order to benefit. It's just that staring directly at it without doing anything else can be too intense. Elaine is asking, do you sit there and stare at it directly and do nothing else. I think we're both saying no. You're doing other things while the light is on. You're on the computer. Other people read. Some people sew.I do other stuff which I choose not to go into because it might confuse people.

If you have it on the counter when you're cooking, have it in front of you while you're reading, using the computer, etc. YOU WILL NATURALLY LOOK UP AND AWAY FROM WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND LOOK AT IT DIRECTLY from time to time. Just like when you're outside, you'll naturally look up at the sun from time to time.

The point I think SQ is making and I agree, is it has to be RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU, CLOSE TO YOUR EYES. I'm sure there will be photos on the box to show you how close it has to be to your eyes in order to be effective.

EG, I hope all this isn't confusing the hell out of you!
Last edited by inspiresuccess on Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:14 pm

Here's the simplest way to say it, Elaine. You don't use a light box like a regular lamp. It's not like you put a light bulb in a floor lamp and read from it. With a full spectrum BULB, you can put it into any lamp you have. But it's subtle, and indirect and won't be anything like a light box. Two completely different things.

Here's my advice. Buy the light box. Try it. Get a feel for it. How soon someone using it will feel better, depends on how far their rhythms are off, how long it's been since they've gotten a good night's sleep, and how sensitive they are to light.

Try it. Like it. Keep it.

Try it. Don't like it. Return it.

Simple!
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby inspiresuccess » Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:50 pm

Wow! The magnifier lamp I bought is perfect! I'm so pleased. I did a great job of research and made the right choice.

I'm glad I got the 5" lens instead of 3". 3" would have been to small. The 5 diopter is a perfect magnification. At first when I tried it for embroidery I was bumping into it when I pulled up the thread. But because the lamp is so easy to adjust and bend into any angle you need, I discovered I could have the lens vertical, still have it magnify just fine, and have plenty of room to pull the thread directly up. Also, I'm so glad I got one with a dimmable light. The brightest is good if I want a quick view of something, but too bright for all the time. The dimmer level is what I need for long term work. There are 6 adjustments -- so much range!

AND... it's supposed to help prevent eye strain and I can tell already it does. I knit for about 10 minutes, looked up into the distance out the window, and instead of having it be blurry, my eyes were clear. It's going to make a huge difference with all the close up work I do.

It's one of those items that you "get what you pay for". For $90 I got a lamp that suits my needs perfectly, will last a long time, will help me work better and therefore make the money to pay for the lamp.

In case anyone is looking for one, here it is:

OptiLumix – Ultra Bright Dimmable 60 SMD LED Magnifying Lamp – 5 Diopter 5” Lens – Adjustable Single Arm
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Fri Nov 11, 2016 11:16 am

Hi inspiresuccess, so glad that you're happy with the lamp. I was dismayed by your first post, in which you complained that the magnification was too high and that the lamp interfered with your technique.

I think folks generally set it up so that the lamp / lens is much closer to their eyes than to their work. Having different light intensities is a great option. Those old clunky fluorescent magnifying lamps were either on or off.
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Re: California restrictions on lamps and light bulbs

Postby SquarePeg » Fri Nov 11, 2016 11:38 am

inspiresuccess wrote:The point I think SQ is making and I agree, is it has to be RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU, CLOSE TO YOUR EYES. I'm sure there will be photos on the box to show you how close it has to be to your eyes in order to be effective.
Yes, the manual recommends a distance range of 12" to 24". But I must stress that I never look directly at the light. The light shines directly at my eyes, but I look over the light or alongside it.
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