Job Websites & Info

Need a job? Hate the idea of a job? Want some ideas for alternative ways of earning a living? This is your forum.

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Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Wed Jun 14, 2006 9:32 am

Lots of people have great ideas about finding jobs and website recommendations. I'm creating a thread so as to organize it into one place. If you have additions, please PM me and I'll be happy to add to this list! Thanks! From pattyn My trick for finding people who work at any company is to Google the company name and the word alumni. Among the listings it finds will be people reporting in their school's alumni news on their career at the target company. Other Advice Call the receptionist and ask who is the manager of X department. 95% will tell you - the others are screening and won't. For the ones who don't tell you, call that company at night. When the computer answers and tells you to dial the first letters of the name of who you want, hit random numbers. Sooner or later, they'll find a name that matches. Write it down. The next day, call back asking for that person. When they answer their phone say, \"oh I'm sorry, the receptionist must have forwarded me to the wrong number. Can you please forward me to the X manager.\" 99% of them will. ___________________________________________________________

JOB WEBSITES (Thank you Quest, Longstrider, Merk, pattyn, Wakanami and everyone else)

Freelance work:
quentpartners.com
cybertemp.com
elance.com
ework.com
freeagent.com
guru.com
hireability.com
workaholics4hire.com
portajobs.com
tjobs.com
homeworkingmom.com/jfinder.htm
http://www.vocationvacations.com

JOB SITES
http://www.jobhuntersbible.com/intro/intromez.shtml
http://jobstar.org/contents.php
http://www.rileyguide.com/
http://www.damngood.com/jobseekers/links.html
http://www.fiveoclockclub.com/
http://www.craigslist.org/
http://www.backpage.com/
http://www.indeed.com
http://www.linkedin.com
jobsearch.monster.com
http://www.oodle.com
http://www.lead411.com
http://www.dice.com
http://www.computerjobs.com
http://www.hotjobs.com
http://www.careerbuilder.com
http://www.simplyhired.com
http://www.workzoo.com

Post Resume Free at high tech Computer Job Board: post resumes at IT tech Job Search website, online resumes for technical employment programmer jobs, ...

http://www.computerwork.com/newresume/enter_resume.cfm
http://www.computerjobsfinder.com
http://www.jobbankusa.com/resume.html
http://www.jobsearchaccelerator.com
http://www.YourCareerLinks.com
http://www.jobvertise.com
http://idealist.org
http://www.workingamerica.org/jobtracker

Good Resources for Advice
http://www.rileyguide.com/execute.html
Last edited by Tituba on Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Tituba » Fri Jun 16, 2006 2:46 pm

Starting Own Business Steps See http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/art ... 72,00.html To determine if you'll need a tax ID. If so, you apply for it online. If you use your name for the business (i.e. John Smith Company) you don't need a DBA. If you do create a unique ID, you go down to the town clerk and fill out a DBA form. They stamp it. You take the DBA form to your local bank and open a separate checking accounting under the business name. The town I live in required I also have my landlord sign a paper saying it was OK to use my address for business as where I live is not zoned for business. I had to take that letter to the zoning manager and have him sign off it as well. Not all towns require this, however, as one town over they do not. Talk to your town clerk. If you can't afford to install a separate phone line for the business, then use your cell phone. Put up a basic website. You can get a cheap hosting at http://www.godaddy.com. To find out if the name of your site is already taken, go to http://www.internic.com/whois.html. You do need a website because most people automatically look for one and it gives you creditability. You can also list your hours, rates, info and put up testimonials. You can get good, quality business cards at http://www.overnightprints.com/?ONPSESS ... b15c402ad6 This government website has links to your state and the requirements for setting up a small business. http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/art ... 21,00.html You can also use Google to find what your state requires. Let's say you live in Colorado. In Google type starting+small+business+in+colorado Bookmark http://www.sba.gov/ as it contains useful info. I keep all my records on an Excel. You can go out and buy Quickbooks, but I find that to be overkill for what I need. Do go see an accountant. They will tell you what to keep track of and what receipts to keep. It is best to start off on the right foot. While it is tempting to do your own taxes (my CPA gets $300 an hour!) - don't. There are too many business writeoffs that it is best you just keep good records and your receipts. Pay the accountant and let them do the taxes. Insurance of Self Employed You might want to check out the following resources - http://www.insure.com/health/budget.html http://www.hiaa.org/cons/guidebo.html http://entrepreneurs.about.com/business ... hor1013133
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Postby Tituba » Fri Jun 23, 2006 5:43 am

(Thank you Chrysalilife for the following) Advance warning!!! This post is kind of long to read!!! LOL! I had responded to Tricia56’s questions about some legality questions with regard to what you can ask on an application because while I’m not an attorney, I’m involved in HR and recruiting in my current position and have a little bit of knowledge in the area. Because of my HR/Recruiting exposure, Tituba suggested I give some tips and tricks about the whole application process. Keep in mind that the following is my way of doing things and while some things may remain pretty much the same, I’m sure there are other things – personal pet peeves, etc. – that are different from person to person. For instance, typos are bad in a resume, but if a person is applying for a support role and has a resume that is full of typos, they automatically go into the “No” pile for me. Coming from a support background, that’s just one of my picky points. Resumes: 1. Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! I can’t stress enough how important it is to have a resume that is free from typos and formatting errors. If you aren’t gifted in creative writing and formatting, seek help whether it be from a professional or even a friend that is gifted in those areas! Your resume is your first impression and it’s an opportunity to show your best but if your best is pretty rotten...you get the idea. Give pertinent information without being overly verbose. I realize that this last sentence will probably only be relevant to US based people as the European CV format is very in-depth. 2. To me personally, it makes no difference if you give a bulleted list of duties or a paragraph form of duties, but you need to put something there. You wouldn’t believe how many resumes I get that give me information on where someone worked along with their job title that doesn’t tell me anything about what they did in that role. 3. Dates of employment. I know some people don’t care about this, but I do. If I get a resume with no dates of employment, it automatically goes in the “No” pile. To me, missing information says they’re trying to hide something. I like to see year information at the very least but really prefer to see a month/year format. This also goes to level of experience with certain skill sets. For instance, it’s a very different picture if someone has 2 months of programming experience in an entry level position as opposed to 2 years in a more advanced role. Also, a tip that has garnered me personally some good feedback: Upon first glance, my career history looks like I’ve done a lot of job hopping. I have, but it wasn’t always my “fault”. I’m a typical scanner and generally get bored with a job after a year and a half or so, but for much of my career, I’ve benefited (IMHO) from what would be considered disastrous events by other people – business closings, downsizings, lay offs, etc. It was great for me because I was free to seek a new opportunity, but makes for a sketchy resume when you’ve seemingly gone from job to job. However, when you put on there that you were only at the company for 2 years because they went out of business at the end of the 2 years, you can slant that in such away that it casts a more favorable light. 4. Length. I know some people won’t look at a person’s resume if it’s over one page, for me, I don’t care if it bleeds into two or three pages as long as the information is pertinent. 5. Online resumes. With the advent of sites like Monster.com and CareerBuilder.com it is even easier to get your resume in front of a large audience. I can’t stress enough how important it is to double check the formatting. It can be extremely difficult with these sites to get the formatting right. 6. Always do a cover letter! And yes, that also applies if you're submitting your resume online. 7. Another thing I find somewhat disconcerting is when someone states their objective and it's completely contrary to the position for which they're applying. For example: Objective - To find a full time position when the position they're applying for is part time. Or another one I've seen recently - To find a position in a medical office when my company is a commercial real estate company! Either generic up your objective or make VERY sure you adjust it for the position!! To me it's an element of common sense that seems to elude many people. Interviews: 1. Be on time! 2. Dress appropriately. Like your resume is probably the best “product” I’ll ever see from you, this is probably the best I’m ever going to see you dressed. If it isn’t up to snuff for what’s expected on a daily basis for the role, you’ll probably get passed over. I don’t always expect to see a suit and tie or dress suit, either. We have blue collar maintenance guys that work for our company but I still expect them to put some effort into their appearance when they come in to interview. The last one I hired came into his interview in khakis and a polo. 3. Sit up straight! 4. Don’t be afraid to look your interviewer in the eye. 5. If you have the resources, do some research on the company and be able to show that you did. I find that impressive. My company is public and has tons of info on the web and it’s amazing how many people respond to the question of “What do you know about our company?” with a response like “Nothing, really.” 6. There are certain interview questions that are generic and you can almost bank on being asked them in some form or fashion. You should think about answers and have a good response that doesn’t sound too rehearsed or contrived. Tell me about yourself: This should be around a 90 second sound bite. It’s shouldn’t last much longer than two or three minutes maximum. That starts to get too rambling. This is an overview. The interviewer will pull out the information they want to expand on and ask further questions. I used to be involved in ministry and they trained us to be able to give a 90 second “testimony”. I’ve used the same type of thinking when responding to this type of inquiry from an interviewer. This should include some personal information as well as business but should be slanted to the business end. What is your greatest strength? Most people can answer this pretty well, but if you struggle with “bragging” on yourself, stop it! Whether you realize it or not, you’re marketing yourself for a new job, some bragging is certainly called for. Have confidence in the fact that you’re the best person for the job! In reality, you may not be, but that sense of self confidence will only help you. However, what comes next is usually one of the dreaded questions…What is your greatest weakness? We all have weaknesses and no one is perfect but the struggle comes with how to “frame” it so that you reveal something without revealing too much. Do NOT say “I’m too much of a workaholic!” That is a pat answer that WAY too many people give. Please be more creative. My personal response to this question is: “I tend to have a very direct and straight-forward personality. I personally see this as a good thing because it helps me cut to the chase and get things done without needing a lot of overt explanation. However, I also realize that it can come across to some people that I’m being aggressive, aloof or overbearing therefore, I make an effort to pay attention to other’s reactions and body language so that if I begin to pick up that I’m being perceived in a negative manner, I can adjust my communication.” I address an area of my personality that causes the most interpersonal friction and while I honestly personally don’t see it as a problem and think other people should toughen up and realize it’s just work and not personal that’s not a realistic expectation so it’s on me, particularly as a manager to be sensitive to how I’m perceived. I acknowledge the problem but also state how I try to overcome it. I could go on and on and on with interviewing stuff but those are some of the basics. Getting to the hiring manager: I’m afraid I won’t be much help here. We post this information on our public website for every open position and it’s updated weekly. I will give a word of caution, though, if you do track down the hiring manager and make contact, that’s great! It shows initiative, but there is a fine line between initiative and being a pest. When I’ve had positions open and someone calls me about the position, I’m happy to visit with them and solicit their resume. But when they’re calling me every other day to see if I’m ready to call them in for an interview, that is a BIG turn off. However, being in an HR role, I’m more attuned to the rules and regulations and processes for things and am not impressed when someone tries to circumvent those processes and is overly aggressive about doing so. I’m actually in process of starting a business that does affordable resumes and coaching and such because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve looked at resumes and been in interviews and thought “Oh honey, you need help!” There have been so many times that well qualified people got passed over because their resume was sloppy and they didn’t interview well. By the same turn, I know that there have probably been times I’ve gotten a job over someone who was better qualified simply because I gave the better interview.
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Postby Tituba » Thu Aug 31, 2006 5:14 am

A couple more sites for people 50+ looking for a job: http://www.retirementjobs.com http://careersat50.monster.com/
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Postby Tituba » Sat Mar 17, 2007 12:22 pm

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Postby BarbaraSher » Fri Jun 01, 2007 6:58 pm

Have I told you lately that you're fabulous, Tituba?
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Postby Tituba » Sat Jun 16, 2007 1:33 pm

Have I told you lately that you're fabulous, Tituba?
No, but nice to hear from time to time. :)
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Postby Tituba » Wed Jun 27, 2007 6:16 am

THANK YOU AVATC:

US Government jobs http://www.usajobs.gov
http://www.getafreelancer.com
http://www.rentacoder.com

Also, I set up Google alerts for stuff I want to see. You can create alerts that take advantage of the Google site:xyz.com command and/or specify key words.
http://www.craigslist.com

Research companies http://www.vault.com
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Postby Tituba » Sat Jul 28, 2007 1:30 pm

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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:03 pm

You register at this site for free and then can do searches on companies to possibly find out hiring manager. It is always best to send your resume to an individual than HR. http://www.spoke.com
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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Mon Apr 14, 2008 2:15 am

After the interview: The interview is over. You feel terrific. The job is just what you've been looking for; the manager's style suits you well, opportunity abounds, and it's a good company. If you settle back and wait, however, you could be missing an opportunity to stand out from the competition. Here are some things that could make the difference: The hot-button thank-you letter. As soon as you get home, write a thank-you letter. Most generic letters simply thank the interviewer and rehash a few reasons why the candidate thinks he or she is the right person for the job. Instead, step into the interviewer's shoes and isolate the areas about which the interviewer had the most interest. Once you've isolated those hot-buttons, ask yourself what you can offer that employer in those areas. After the anxiety of the meeting is past, you'll probably think of several things you could have added to the discussion. Identify accomplishments and past experiences that tie most closely to the interviewer's interest area. Try to choose things that weren't mentioned in the interview, if possible. Have someone else proofread the letter, so every detail is perfect. The inside reference. If you know someone who works at the company, call that person and describe the interview. If the person helped you prepare for the interview with inside information, that person will want to know how it went. The insider may offer to put in a good word for you. This person also may be in a position to keep you informed about progress in the hiring decision. One word of caution, however: If the person applies too much internal pressure or is not a good performer, this strategy could backfire...so be careful. The work sample. If the interviewer was interested in a particular aspect of your work, send samples of it with your thank-you letter. Many people miss this opportunity to send concrete examples (samples of proposals, project summaries) related to what you discussed. Show your interest in the interviewer. Along with your letter, you may want to send an article about something the two of you discussed. A quick trip to the library to locate some pertinent trade journal articles is worthwhile, since the receiver will probably be grateful and recognize your initiative. The last sales opportunity. Rather than calling the employer after two weeks to simply ask whether a decision has been made, use your follow-up call to convey enthusiasm and find out if you can provide anything else to help the manager make a decision. For example, if presentation skills are an important part of the position, ask if he or she would like to observe you delivering a short presentation. Prepare your references. If you have been asked for references after the interview, the employer is interested in you. Notify your references immediately, if they are likely to be called. Explain what the job is, who the caller may be, and what you think the caller may be most interested in. Recount some of the interview to your reference and mention the accomplishments in which the interviewer seemed most interested. This will help the reference start thinking about how to answer questions. If there is a particular thing you want your reference to mention, by all means suggest it. The reference will probably be grateful for the reminder, since it may have been a while since you worked together. Finally, if the interviewer seemed concerned about any particular area, discuss it with the reference and talk through possible ways to address it.
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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Thu Jul 10, 2008 8:01 pm

Good site with lots of useful tips http://www.candidateadvantage.com/
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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Sun Nov 16, 2008 10:25 am

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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Fri Jan 09, 2009 4:18 am

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Re: Job Websites & Info

Postby Tituba » Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:09 am

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