Barbara's Silk Road passion

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Barbara's Silk Road passion

Postby BarbaraSher » Sun Apr 20, 2003 11:24 am

MDG Member Posts: 1681 Registered: Mar 2002 posted April 20, 2003 01:01 PM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Barbara, I searched Yahoo for - "Heavenly Horses", +Ferghana - and I found fourteen sites that mention both those terms. (If you search only for - "Heavenly Horses" - there are 740 sites.) For your enjoyment... http://ca.google.yahoo.com/bin/query_ca?p=%22heavenly+horses%22%2c+%2bPamir Ray didn't see my print-out of your interest until this a.m. Right away quick, out came the atlases, and when they disappointed we were off and running for the computer. That man loves maps!!! Now he is cooking turkey and yams and sprouties, while I tell you of our find. I'm off to look at the 14 sites, and learn some more about those horses. - Mahara Ray loves maps?! I'm *dying* to find detailed topological maps that show *why* people took the route from Xian to Lanzhou (lots of reading revealed that they hugged the foot of the Tibetan plateau on their left because the melting snows created oases at the bottom, and they didn't move far from these foothills because the Gobi desert was burning on their right). It took me a long time to figure that out on my own. I understand their route through the across the Taklamakan Desert to Kashgar but then I'd love great, detailed visual computer maps, the easy-to-understand kind like those you see on some weather channels -- to show exactly where the Silk Road path goes after that. I have the closest thing to such maps all over the walls of my little travel room, and I draw them myself or make them out of playdough, using one of dozens of books I own, reading the story of where someone went, when they saw Rakaposhi, when they saw Nanga Parbat, where the Indus smashes through this mad mess, how the major rivers start on the wrong side of the Himalaya range, that kind of stuff, trying to constuct a visual topographic version of their story but I know my versions are pathetic (like 8th and 9th century monks trying to extract and assemble the lost writings of Plato and Aristotle from the fragments in comments made about his works). Where are those maps? I want them so badly. posted April 20, 2003 01:35 PM Wow! Mahara, that link took me to some great great places that "silk road" alone never took me to. One which adds even more pieces to my understanding of the geography of the silk road. Thanks!!! Incidentally, Turks feel very connected with everyone on the silk routes. Our little village of Ortahisar is said to have been originally settled by 7 brothers from Uzbekistan 800 years ago. They dug the first cave homes in the "mountain" in the middle of the present-day old village. A friend's parents presently live in a half-submerged cave house where their ancestors have lived for 800 years. And the words for "man" and "black" (and many others) are identical from Turkey to Mongolia. But until our involvement in Afghanistan, most maps left all of Central Asia almost blank. Maps folded or ended right in the middle of the area I've been most interested in. (I tear out the maps of every airline magazine).
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Postby BarbaraSher » Sun Apr 20, 2003 11:27 am

BarbaraSher Moderator Posts: 2603 Registered: Jul 1999 posted September 04, 2002 11:08 PM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Well, you never know. Let's see if we bore each other. What is the jolliest thing you've found out lately (from one of your unusual interests?) I just realized that the Ferghana Valley, home of the "Heavenly Horses" that nearly bankrupted one of the earliest Chinese dynasties and inspired one of the most beautiful sculptures in the world, is way up there in the Pamir Mts.! It took me almost a year to find the Pamir Mts at all -- or to understand that they are the hub of some of the greatest mountain ranges in the world (including the Himalayas). And I always thought the Ferghana Valley was down in the lowlands. How about that?! It brightened my breakfast reading enormously this week. Boring, right? Well, I don't care. I still want to make a playdough model of those places and try to imagine I'm a microscopic creature making my way through the passes. (Different strokes for different folks, right?) Well, tell yours anyway. Let's see how it goes. IP: Logged MDG Member Posts: 1681 Registered: Mar 2002 posted September 05, 2002 06:11 AM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I have a husband who loves maps. I mean, he'll sell, or give the kids, all his National Geographics, but he keeps the maps! He'll be onto the Ferghana Valley in the Pamir Mountains like a shot, and won't quit until he finds them. I'll print your post for his breakfast reading, Barbara. Me? I'm enjoying kinesiology, and I've long been interested in organizational behavior, particularly between management and employees. IP: Logged MDG Member Posts: 1681 Registered: Mar 2002 posted September 05, 2002 06:22 AM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Jolly discoveries? Just about exactly where is Ortahisar on the map of Turkey, and lots of photos at corbis.com and elswhere.
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Postby MDG » Sun Apr 20, 2003 3:13 pm

I goofed above. I actually searched - "Heavenly Horses", +Pamir - not +Ferghana. In case anyone wants to try this. We came on one site that describes the percentages of Turkiye that are on each of the three continents(?) Anyway, they said that the country is usually considered to be more European than anything. Probably thanks to Ataturk. Question: Is there a whole lot of difference between a detailed topological map and a topographical scale model? Is one flat, and used as directions for making the other in layers, three dimensional? Some of the terms are confusing me. Another Question: Who do we know on the inside of map companies, model-making companies, and the like? I would just love them to read your post... ********************************************* Ray loves maps?! I'm *dying* to find detailed topological maps that show *why* people took the route from Xian to Lanzhou (lots of reading revealed that they hugged the foot of the Tibetan plateau on their left because the melting snows created oases at the bottom, and they didn't move far from these foothills because the Gobi desert was burning on their right). It took me a long time to figure that out on my own. I understand their route through the across the Taklamakan Desert to Kashgar but then I'd love great, detailed visual computer maps, the easy-to-understand kind like those you see on some weather channels -- to show exactly where the Silk Road path goes after that. I have the closest thing to such maps all over the walls of my little travel room, and I draw them myself or make them out of playdough, using one of dozens of books I own, reading the story of where someone went, when they saw Rakaposhi, when they saw Nanga Parbat, where the Indus smashes through this mad mess, how the major rivers start on the wrong side of the Himalaya range, that kind of stuff, trying to constuct a visual topographic version of their story but I know my versions are pathetic (like 8th and 9th century monks trying to extract and assemble the lost writings of Plato and Aristotle from the fragments in comments made about his works). Where are those maps? I want them so badly. ********************************************* We could woo and cajole a map-maker into all kinds of mischief, don't you think? And, I love the passage you wrote... ******************************************** Incidentally, Turks feel very connected with everyone on the silk routes. Our little village of Ortahisar is said to have been originally settled by 7 brothers from Uzbekistan 800 years ago. They dug the first cave homes in the "mountain" in the middle of the present-day old village. A friend's parents presently live in a half-submerged cave house where their ancestors have lived for 800 years. And the words for "man" and "black" (and many others) are identical from Turkey to Mongolia. ******************************************** Do you know what that suggests to me? A book! Do we know any great authors? Anyone who would catch fire with a story like that and interview all the old-timers in Ortahisar, and anyone else who knows things, and writes a smashing great whopper of a historic thriller that goes on to become a great classical movie (as close to the book as possible) and opens doors for cultural exchange worldwide? I mean, the author wouldn't even have to be experienced, just really interested, and collaberate. And they could even be Turkish, and not speak English, and have a good translator. And it could be more of a history book with fine swash and buckle adventures included. (Oh, where is Ronald Coleman when you need him? Wouldn't he have made a fine Ataturk? Moustache and all.) And...we could have a writing contest, with first prize to be a commission to write the story for Hands-on-Hips, on location. And, the book could be self-published by Hands-on-Hips, with beautiful embossed hard-cover first editions crafted in limited quantity. With kilim cases to protect them. Does anybody around here write? (I love this little grinning Smilie...) - Image - [This message has been edited by MDG (edited April 20, 2003).]
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Postby BarbaraSher » Sun Apr 20, 2003 5:00 pm

A little off the subject, but I found an old post here on the bbs (been looking for it for a long time) so I'm posting it here. (I've been to this site, but then lost the URL) >Four British girls are currently undertaking the original Silk Road road by traditional means, i.e. horse and camel to raise money for charity. > >We are running a website for them and they are sending updates each month detailing their progress. > >It thought perhaps this may be of interest. If you wish to put the web-address on the list of links on your own website, the URL is >http://www.datadial.co.uk/silkroad/ > >Kind regards, > >Steve Gould
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Postby MDG » Fri Apr 25, 2003 3:26 am

Barbara, Just poking around, I searched Google for the following terms... (Quotation marks, etc., count.) "The Silk Road", +"detailed maps" Found 104 sites, including... http://www.dharma6.com/html/introduction.html - which you may already know. "The Silk Road", +"topographical maps" Found 31 sites. Kashgar, +"Tibetan plateau", +maps Found 97 sites, including... http://www.trans-himalaya.ndirect.co.uk/tibetan.htm Perhaps there is something in these for you. I can't help but think that what you need is quite specialized and probably local to those places. Great libraries, museums, and archeologists may have these kinds of maps, but they may be hard to find. Image I also can't help but think that topographical model company would know things (where did I put their name?). After all, topographical maps are one of their most basic tools. I'll keep looking. I like playing detective. Image
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