GREETINGS FROM MONTANA - USA

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GREETINGS FROM MONTANA - USA

Postby clanmother » Thu Nov 07, 2002 10:57 am

Wow! I stumbled on your site accidently as I was looking for information on Turkish Knitting hopeing to find directions make my own Turkish knitting needles or finding where I could buy them. What a blessing to have been led to your site. Your work and yours sites are wonderful. Such talent in the kilim bags and carpets and the painted table cloth and the website set up for it is mind blowing, i.e., SUPER! Didn't find any information on the knitting needles but had a good time cruising the site. Of course I had to send the site to everyone I know and hope my husband will get me kilim bag. I know very little about Turkey but intend on finding out all I can. The picture of the Red Valley took my breath away and I would move into the "old" village in a minute if I could have my computer. I am going to try your "grape molasses" if I understand the recipe. I do make a drink you may know of called Kefir. You use kefir grains as a starter, add goats milk and let it ferment. It is not alcohol, I don't drink, but it is wonderfully healthy to drink. Have you heard of it? This is very exciting. The world is shrinking and that's agood thing. We are now only a key stroke away from each other. What do I do for fun? Let's see, I am involved with rescuing and adopting stray animals that would otherwise be killed at the local animal shelter. I love baking bread, and of course, there is my writing but I side-tracked often to my craft projects. If there is anything I can do to help support any of you, I would be willing. Barb is an Angel and your opportunities are limitless. So - blessing and admiration from Montana. Last week it was 6 degrees F. with snow on the ground. Yesterday it was 60 degrees F. and felt like Spring. Jeeeeeeze! In two days we have another storm coming. Thanks Canada! Sandra ------------------ Believing something is possible is to make it come true.
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Postby MDG » Thu Nov 07, 2002 11:57 pm

Hello Montana! Your home sounds like a fine place to be, Sandra. Barbara Sher is a most remarkable woman. She tells us she has always loved the history of the Silk Road, the path of ancient caravans from China to the Middle East, I believe, bearing silks and spices and articles of great beauty for trade. The whole history is filled with adventure, and possibly intrigue. Barbara has also mentioned an affection for the Mrs. Polifax stories. In my searching for information about Turkiye (that's the way they spell it), I have seen some wonderful pictures of things I never knew existed. Angel told me the address of an excellent website. Perhaps you can find it within the posts of the last few months. I also found many beautiful pictures by searching the files at www.corbis.com Barbara has told us the ladies of Ortahisar also make beautiful lace. I hope one day to see it. Oh yes! I saw a program on PBS, I think, of the race of archeologists to find an ancient Roman city before a new dam on the Euphrates flooded the area forever. By chance and great detective work they uncovered a home with the most beautiful tile floors you could imagine. These floors were made by a great artist and showed scenes of Roman legends and life, all in colors as vibrant today as they were when they were created. And they were intact. They were lifted and removed to a great museum in Turkiye. Then the land was flooded. We will always wonder, of course, what else is there. The dam is an important part of Turkish life and agriculture I am sure. 30,000 people had to leave their homes. We have come to know a little about Angel and her family and some of the others you see on this website. Some of us have been to visit them, and some of us hope to one day. As you read these posts you will see that much in their village is similar to our own lives, and much is different. I am particularly fascinated with the volcanic growing soil and the caves where they keep fruit until the lemons become sweet! Amazing. I hope you will have the opportunity to read Barbara's books. (Wishcraft is a very good place to begin.) She has discovered some wonderful ways to make our lives more fulfilling. And they truly work. I am not the same person I was seven months ago. Many, many people will tell you the same. You can see Barbara on PBS, and you may be able to attend a workshop. There is one in Edmonton, Alberta November 14th and one in Calgary November 16th. Tickets through The Learning Annex, I believe. I would like to tell you that, although Barbara's work is all about you and your dreams, no one is ever asked to reveal a single bit of personal information at her workshops. In fact, they are more fun than a barrel of monkeys! Ask as you will, no one here will tell you any more than that about these events. Wild horses couldn't drag it out of me! If you can possibly attend, do. Or, as Barbara says, don't even think of missing it! You sound like you have found your calling in life, and that you are a very happy person. I'd like to suggest that you read two threads on the boards where Barbara asks folks how they found their dreams. The stories told are awe-inspiring. I'll come back later to tell you where you'll find them. Will you describe Turkish knitting needles for us? Perhaps our good Angel will be able to help you find them. Welcome to Barbara's boards. And, we Canadians don't really mean for our winters to spill into Montana, it's just that we have these super powerful snow blowers, you see, and we have to put the white stuff somewhere! Image - MDG
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Postby clanmother » Fri Nov 08, 2002 4:11 pm

Good to hear from you MDG and thank you so much taking time to reply. I have yet to manefest all of my dreams from the time I was a small child I loved books, preferably about children living in far away lands. I still remember the first book I was allowed to take home from the school library, "The Good Master". I think this firl lived in western Europ and wore brightly colored clothes and traveled in a donkey cart. I bet I read that book 50 times. In my mind, I was her tending her flocks, spinning her wool, helping her mother bake. I even insisted that my mother braid my hair like the picture but of course she French braided (plaited) it so tight I looked Asian but that was fine with me. Another culture that seemed to far away and mysterious and colorful and wonderful. I also grew up very very poor. We did not have indoor plumbing until was 6 years old, now you have to realize that this was many many years ago. VBG I was terrified of our new indoor bathroom but shortly learned it was better than tip toeing out into the dark in the middle of the night, whistling all the way, because I was so afraid of bears. LOL Ah! What memories! No one even thought about eduation or bettering themselves, they were too busy earning a living and trying to survive. My grandfather was unable to read or write. He'd worked the ranch his whole life and at that time it was more important. My the time I reached the end of the 9th grade, I quit school and missed it more than I could tell anyone. But there just did not seem to be much reason as I knew I would get married anyway and raise a family. I suppose I had one of those "I know everything attitudes" that is youths folly (mistake). I did get married and had two children, wrote them books to read and read them to them. In the back of my mind the muses always whispered to me in my ear at night and called me toward what eventually would become my career. No one ver told me I could be more, that I was intelligent and could accomplish anything I chose to. In my forties, I went to an adult education class, got my General High School Diploma (GED) and enrolled at a city Vo Tech school and went through their Nursing program, Loving every page turning moment of it. But still the muses, whispering. With that degree I never went to work, I started teaching pottery and cermics in my basement. Loved that also. But I need discipline, more belief in myself and focus. Those darn muses!!! LOL One day I told my husband that wanted to write books. Now you must realize that my husband had a college degree and in my mind was therefore more qualified than I was. It was such a sinking feeling but a friend recommended a book on Creative Visualization so I bought it. It chaged my life. I have have had wonderful success but I will never turn loose of the little girl that was so poor, had a love of books, and not much else. It works. I have survived many hardhips, some too ugle to speak. When I speak to groups I tell them I have survived everything but alien abduction and maybe I just don't remember, of course with a grin on my face. Tonight I am buying Barb's book just to go over everything again. Reinforcement is so important. TURKISH KNITTING NEEDLES: All I know is that the original knitting needles that are purported to be used still in Turkey and in Germany, have hooks on the end that come to a fine point. I knew little else. I did e-mail the Ministry of Culture in Turkiye and aske if they had any historical reference on them but that was a long time ago so I don't know if the will answer. HOpefully they will. I'm sure they come in all the same sizes as knitting needles, the only difference is the sharp hook on the end. With direction, I know I could even try to make my own. I love that. And, MDG, I owe Canadaaan apology. Our impending (coming) storm is coming from California. My interests are baking bread, am also looking for ancient starters for sour dough bread, my grat grandmother was native American so my aunts taught me to bead, which I love, but it is micro work and my hands are getting funny. Has anyone ever noticed how similar some of the designs are in Native American bead work and quilting and the Kilim Patterns. Although each have wonderfully original designs, I see the similarities. This only confirms my belief that we are all one and that there can be unity within diversity. Don't you think? Any bread bakers out there? I'm trying to talk my husband into letting me build a clay oven in my back yard like the Pueblo Indians have in Taos, New Mexico. They have ben used for centuries and bread is simply delicious. Now that I have bored everyone to death, I will wish your houses a thousand blessings. Be well, and be safe. Sandra in Montana ------------------ Believing something is possible is to make it come true.
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Postby angel » Fri Nov 08, 2002 4:40 pm

Hi Sandra, Nice you meet you!!! How are you?You came on the bulletin board I am very happy.Thank you for you like our work. Do you need information knitting needles for cord? You will made pullover or the same think? I didn't make knitting by cod.I made a lot of knitting needles for lace.I made paint to cloths. I think you can make to grape molasses.It' s taste is very good.We don't use goat milk.I don't know this taste.I am soory I don't know one word and I didn't find in dictionary This word " Kefir". Here is weather is the same spring today.before cold but now is okey. Thank you your all good thinking for us. Nice you meet you. See you Hatice
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Postby MDG » Fri Nov 08, 2002 9:14 pm

Hi, Sandra, Here are some things I learned: There are many sites on the web that talk about hooked knitting needles. The few sites I looked at didn't show pictures, although one did describe a style of knitting I couldn't follow. (Something about passing the yarn over the shoulder; or around the neck; or through a hook pinned to the knitter's clothing. I think the purpose was to slow it down.) Just now I looked up "knitting needles", +Turkish on Yahoo! Many sites are listed there, but I only looked at one. www.schoolhousepress.com Wow! I didn't see any hooked needles but I saw a lot of other stuff from all over the world. They even have something called 'Russian Knitting Sticks' which they say are almost impossible to photograph. I wonder what that is all about! Perhaps their videos would help you. I think you would have a wonderful time looking at some of those sites. There is a single hooked needle in my mother-in-law's boxful that I inherited. It is a long, fairly thick needle and the hook is of a similar size. I'd like to tell you of one of my favorite sites, www.knotjustknitting.com A lady in Australia shows a lot about 'scrumbling'. I don't know if you have heard of it. I find it fascinating. The woman's name is Prudence Mapstone, and she has a very nice sense of mixing colors. Do you know what I mean? I knew another woman who crocheted afghans of many colors, but they ended up looking like fine tapestries because of the colors she combined. One was many shades of reds, even though she had included a little each of very different colors, the effect was of red wines. Beautiful! I tried, but I couldn't achieve the richness that she did. She had the gift. Yes, I do see the similarities between the two design styles you mention. A long time ago I heard a native Canadian artist tell about taking a design from a nicely marked stone. He suggested tracing paper. One traces the design from the stone, then uses more paper to smooth and refine the design. After three or four tracings a very interesting pattern appears. He called it 'the spirit of the stone'. I think that's a wonderful idea. One of my early favorite books was called 'Twig'. If you ever get the chance to read it, I think you'll see why. Later, I read and re-read 'Peter Pan' many times - love it. Barbara started a thread in General Discussion called 'If you are doing what you love, tell us about it'. You'll find it at www.barbarasher.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/001112.html The stories there are awesome. Another thread you will like, I'm sure, is www.barbarasher.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/001054.html 'How did you figure out what you wanted?' Your story isn't the least bit boring. I hope you will tell us more. I am certain there are many here who would like to hear about your books and your speaking and all of your creativity. I know I would. Do they have big snowblowers in Californa, too? Image - MDG [This message has been edited by MDG (edited November 09, 2002).]
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Postby clanmother » Sat Nov 09, 2002 12:11 am

ANGEL: Thank you so much for replying. I am such a fan of all that you do and partucularly the WebLog. I have a friend, a very talented person who does the same things I do, but learns them much quicker. Tomorrow morning I have a knitting class with our group and I will probably be the only one that punctures (stabs) herself but I am going to learn. When you hit your crone stage, (Maiden, Mother & Crone) one should relaize that there is so much left to learn and to experience and accomplish.My belief is that when you achieve someonething wonderful, you need to give back, somewhere, somehow. I spent my whole life taking care of family and gadening and canning (preserving my bountiful harvest) that when I did achieve some measure of success it scared me do death. So I went down to the local Woman's State Prison and started teaching a creative writing class. Over the last four years I have come to love all of them and now work with them as they get out. We need to do things like that. And it's important to let them give back to you, which they do often without even knowing it. GRAPE MOLLASSES: We have a chery that grows here near where I live that is called choke cherry or sour cherry. The are wonderful to harvest and in our wet years they are just huge. Billings the High Plains, although are close to Yellowstone Park but mostly dry land. ANyway, I pick the cherries in the early Fall, bring them home, wash them, and then I grind them seed and all. The I strain that mixture by putting it ober my sink in cheese cloth (layers of gauze) and lelt it drip over night into a kettle. I take that juice in the morning and boil it down for hours, then add some sugar and pectin. It comes out a wonderful deep purple syrup or Jelly. I will find out some info on kefir and post it Angel. MDG: Wow! Thanks for the sites. I have been looking for these needles for months. Wonder why the Russian ones are hard to photograph, Maybe they are very very thin. HMM. I really love making my own tools. Where my mother's ancestors lived were in the hills of Kentucky and Tennesse and Virgina and they made "tooth brush rugs" and I could not find the turn of the century tooth brushes that they filed down used so I made my own out of deer horn and they are great. Do you all ever do that type of painint on scarves? I love the scarves you wear and how you wrap them on your head. We have such bitterly cold winds here and that would be just the ticket. It is midnight here in Montana and I am going to bed. See all of you in your dreams. If I can find it, I will share my list of plants that grow around here that will dye facric. I've only tried it twice for some yarn, once with Rosemary & Thyme and the color was so beautiful. A deep rich maroon which is one of my favorite colors. And then once again with Onion Skins I boiled. It came out somewhere between yello and mustard and orange. Thanks MDG for looking for sites for me. I will go there. I f you want to read aa very wonderful historic book on knitting, crocheting, needle work, buy a copy of Mary Thomas's Knitting Book. It is a reprint of a very ancient book and available through Amazon. That's where I first find out about the needles. Jeeze! I am just so excited about meeting all of you I sure run of at the mouth (talk to much) Sandra Thrilled Silly in Montana P.S. How do you use the smiley faces.
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Postby MDG » Sun Nov 10, 2002 7:52 pm

Hi, Sandra! Smilies are found to the left of the space where you type your posts. There you will find the symbols to type to create the faces. For example: if you type a colon : followed immediately by a right-hand bracket sign ) then you get this Image. Lots of fun. I know an artist who paints on silk. She uses resist to outline her traced designs. Perhaps I can get a copy of that knitting book the next time I visit my favorite second-hand store. I will try there first. You have such an interesting life, Sandra. I need to take a rest from computering, in order to get some work done, so please don't be disappointed if I miss your posts for a time. I will try to return at least once a week. I hope that will be soon enough. I'm sure others will stop in to say 'Hello'. Have you posted in General Discussion yet? That's where everyone looks first, it seems. Wishes and Obstacles is also very busy. All the best. - MDG P.S. I had trouble getting this posted last night, so I saved it until now. Hope you didn't mind the wait! - MDG
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Postby BarbaraSher » Mon Nov 11, 2002 7:50 pm

You said: If I can find it, I will share my list of plants that grow around here that will dye yarn. Please do that for us! I love your description of the rosemary and thyme colors.
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Postby ebrazley » Wed Nov 27, 2002 2:14 pm

Hello Angel, My name is Ella and I just wanted to tell you that your kilim rugs are lovely. You are also doing a good job of working on your web site. I live in the United States in "Kentucky". Kentucky is known best for their racing horses, and liquor. Every year the most important event here is The Kentucky Derby, where people from a lot of different countries come to enter their horses in the races and have a good time. Just wanted you to know that I enjoy your web site.
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Postby Sezent » Sun Jan 26, 2003 10:58 pm

Hi Sandra, I watched Barbara Sher today at PBS and visited her site. I am Turkish and know about Turkish knitting needles. They are about 6 inches long, thin needles with a hook at one end. They are used to knit socks and/or gloves. You need to use 5 of them to knit a sock. My grandmother used to knit with them. Unfortunately I never learned from her how to do it. I will look and ask around if I can find a set for you. Ward Regards from Dana Point CA Sezen <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by clanmother: <B>Wow! I stumbled on your site accidently as I was looking for information on Turkish Knitting hopeing to find directions make my own Turkish knitting needles or finding where I could buy them. What a blessing to have been led to your site. Your work and yours sites are wonderful. Such talent in the kilim bags and carpets and the painted table cloth and the website set up for it is mind blowing, i.e., SUPER! Didn't find any information on the knitting needles but had a good time cruising the site. Of course I had to send the site to everyone I know and hope my husband will get me kilim bag. I know very little about Turkey but intend on finding out all I can. The picture of the Red Valley took my breath away and I would move into the "old" village in a minute if I could have my computer. I am going to try your "grape molasses" if I understand the recipe. I do make a drink you may know of called Kefir. You use kefir grains as a starter, add goats milk and let it ferment. It is not alcohol, I don't drink, but it is wonderfully healthy to drink. Have you heard of it? This is very exciting. The world is shrinking and that's agood thing. We are now only a key stroke away from each other. What do I do for fun? Let's see, I am involved with rescuing and adopting stray animals that would otherwise be killed at the local animal shelter. I love baking bread, and of course, there is my writing but I side-tracked often to my craft projects. If there is anything I can do to help support any of you, I would be willing. Barb is an Angel and your opportunities are limitless. So - blessing and admiration from Montana. Last week it was 6 degrees F. with snow on the ground. Yesterday it was 60 degrees F. and felt like Spring. Jeeeeeeze! In two days we have another storm coming. Thanks Canada! Sandra </B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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Postby clanmother » Mon Jan 27, 2003 12:15 am

Hello everyone - I have missed posting. Let me explain but first I must say I how silly I feel telling you all about this. Last Fall I took a horrid fall. No, it couldn't be something dramatic like saving someone from a an out of control bus. I just didn't pick my foot up high enough coming out of my office into another room. Now realize I am pretty short, five foot two inches so I should not have that far to fall but it seemed like it took forever. I messed up my knee and crushed the tissue on my left leg. They thought I had blood clots and kept scaning my leg and therefore had to stay off it. It made for a very long three months of not being on the computer or walking my dogs or getting in on Barb's radio talks. It was horrid and although very painful, it was the staying quiet and immobile that bothered me the most. It is better each day and now at least I am walking. So, that's my sad story. Other than worrying about the earthquakes in Turkey, I truly hope everyone has been all right and were not affected by them. I need to catch up with each and everyone of you. The weather here has been so unstable. We were below zero farenheit, with lots of snow two days ago and now it is all melting and we we are having a chinook. Chinook is an Indian word for "snow eater" and the winds blow here from the Southwest and warm things up. The weather is changing. But I believe that is worldwide problem. Has anyone noticed it besides me? Sezen - thanks for the info on the knitting needles. I have about given up in that area so if you find some, you will be a miracle worker. Thank you so much for your considerations. My friends think I am on a quest that isn't going to materialize. So, hello to all and love to all. MDG I will answer your e-mail toorrow and will get that post up on natural dyes as soon as possible. Please catch me up on what's going on. Sandra in Montana USA
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Postby BarbaraSher » Mon Jan 27, 2003 6:01 pm

Welcome back, dear Sandra from Montana (one of the most beautiful places in the U.S. some of the neatest people I ever met.) So sorry about your fall. I don't know how you managed to stay still all that time. Glad you're back online and that your hope of finding Turkish knitting needles may actually be fulfilled! Sezent, welcome to you and thanks for your kindness. I hope you'll be a regular here, and that we can help you too!
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Postby MDG » Tue Jan 28, 2003 10:04 am

Sandra! I am so glad you are back, hale and hearty! But, please, my dear, don't try to e-mail me until I say this worm has been stomped! Your server may not let you send to sick computers (I hope), because this infection is hovering, waiting for your return address. Then it would probably try to send you nasty e-mails, with my name on them, to make your computer sick, too. A person doesn't even have to open the 'attachment' for this thing to get in. All it needs is that your computer automatically displays the text of the message when you click on the information line, even if you only do so to delete it. If you are using the automatic e-mail display bar (across the bottom of your screen) get into your options, somewhere, and change it so that you must double-click to see an undoubted message text. You are probably one of the smart ones who already knows this. I didn't, and I got a message, supposedly from my nephew. I didn't like the way it was written, so I e-mailed him at his more usual address to ask. There is nothing 'sensitive' in my computer, thank heaven, but I certainly do resent having this thing sent to my friends. My guru may fix this machine in a couple of days. (It is a Trojan worm, and a real devil, if that helps anyone.) How calm you must be to stay still for three months! Congratulations! I hope you healed beautifully, and will be out for football in no time. Image Sezent, welcome to Barbara's bulletin boards, and thankyou so much for describing the use of Turkish knitting needles. There was a fairly thick one, about 10 or 12 inches long, in my mother-in-law's collection. I could only imagine that it was for correcting a mistake or for adding to a finished knitted piece. Calgary is famous for its Chinooks, and there is often a picture in the paper of Calgarians walking about in shirtsleeves in January. Once, the tulips were blooming! And, tulips came from Turkiye, didn't they? Among many other lovely things. I'm really getting into my writing, thanks to Barbara's Tele Idea Party, so if I seem to disappear for a while, I'm still thinking of you all. Happily, - MDG
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Postby MDG » Tue Jan 28, 2003 10:08 am

Sandra, Do you have time to describe or list the names of local plants used to dye fibers? Or, is there a website we should look at? Thankyou, good Clanmother. (I love that name!)
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