Scanners are fast thinkers who are multi-talented.

What should you do when you want to do everything? If you're fascinated by everything, and you've been called dabbler, dilettante, undisciplined, indecisive etc., this forum is for you.

Moderators: Tituba, BarbaraSher

Postby Scenario Thinker » Thu Nov 24, 2005 8:47 pm

The Rockport Insitute test had some similar tested abilities that I've named in RED below the aptitude below. I might go look my results up and see if I can match more. One thing, if you were to go to the Johnson O'connor test place, they could have equipment that might test more abilities than Rockport could. It was just paper and pencil, so limited in what you can do. List of Apparently Independent and Unlearned Aptitudes A. Category: Reasoning/Processing 1. Systems reasoning: an information organizing aptitude that takes data and puts it into a system, or takes data and organizes it into a system. Often the basis of an interest in history. Analyzing things. Useful for programmers, editors, process planners. 2. Flash reasoning: condition of (mostly) accurately jumping to conclusions, quickly seeing discrepancies and errors, with a need to be critical and answer questions. Natural debaters, they take strong partisan positions. Therapists, troubleshooters, detectives, lawyers. They tested Diagnostic Reasoning. 3. Cause/effect reasoning: seeing extended parallel cause and effect sequences. This awareness of the long term makes it easier to conceptualize and achieve long-term goals in diverse areas. 4. Numerical reasoning: a feel for the patterns and rhythms in numbers. Arithmetical type activities. They had numerical patterns, but not necessarily arithmetic. 5. Logical reasoning: naturally processing data in the form of syllogisms. Programmers, logicians. They tested Logical Reasoning. B. Category: States of Being 1. Mechanical/spatial: an aptitude for things and 3D space. Mostly found together, the mechanical and spatial can exist separately. Engineers, air traffic controllers, doctors, truckers. They tested Spatial Reasoning. 2. Semantic equivalence: aptitude/need for group functioning, including people politics and the ability to identify with others, read vibes well. High: sales, management. Low: useful for specialists, artists and independent decision makers. 3. Idea production: rate at which ideas are produced (independent of idea quality). High: communicators of various types. Low: useful in high concentration areas like accounting, surgery. High Idea Flow. 4. Sensory discrimination: making fine sensory discriminations. Winemakers, coffee buyers, decorators. C. Category: Memory/Perceptual Sensitivity 1. Observation: aptitude for looking at things, recognizing and remembering them. 2. Number (visual): remembering, noticing numbers. Yes, numerical and character memorization. 3. Design: sensitivity to and memory for designs. They tested this. 4. Word (visual): memory for and sensitivity to written words. Yes, numerical and character memorization. 5. Color: memory for and sensitivity to color. 6. Tone: memory for and sensitivity to tones. 7. Rhythm: memory for and sensitivity to rhythm and timing. 8. Number (audible): memory and sensitivity to spoken numbers. 9. Word (audible): memory and sensitivity to spoken words. D. Miscellaneous 1. Near Point Visual Efficiency: close-in visual scanning as in paperwork, CRT screens. They tested clerical type work accuracy. 2. Finger dexterity: good hands. 3. Small tool dexterity: tweezers, eyebrow pencils. They tested how fast you could accurately fill in little dots on a page.
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Re: It's obvious

Postby Scenario Thinker » Thu Nov 24, 2005 8:50 pm

paralegalgirl wrote:Scenario - you need a job like Heather's where you administer websites. PLG
Thanks for the idea, PLG.
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Postby Scenario Thinker » Thu Nov 24, 2005 8:53 pm

Jezicka wrote:I've been wanting to do the aptitude testing for awhile, actually. There's an outfit here in Arlington that does it, but I was a little put off because a friend who went there had the experience that somebody here, I think, mentioned too-- that is-- basically being told, yeah, there are a lot of things you could do... :roll: Like this is really news to anyone over the age of maybe 15...
I'd say a lot of TMA's do aptitude testing! :) That's kind of what it boils down to though, you CAN do a lot of things. So, you really end up having to find what you love anyhow. But, I enjoyed taking the tests, I don't think I wasted my time.
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Postby Scenario Thinker » Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:03 pm

paralegalgirl wrote: ... it seemed as though he was listing a lot of problems that "TMA's" had. It sounded like there were more problems that were associated with it than benefits.
When you're interested in a lot of things and you kinda see through things and realize how much bull crap goes on in the world. Thus, there can be problems interacting with other people on that sort of superficial level (i.e. cow towing to authority, doing something you value versus driven by money, etc.).
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Postby Scenario Thinker » Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:16 pm

Scenario Thinker wrote:
Jezicka wrote:"You don't just have these ideas and that's the end of it. The HRIP person wants and needs to express them, try them out, act on them. That is one reason HRIP individuals find limits hard to deal with. Set limits and the HRIP person often can't help thinking over, under, around and beyond them." Then I continued on to his 29 question 'test' for HRIP aptitude... He says anything over a 6.5 is high. I come out a 10... :lol:
I'll have to check that one out.
At first I didn't think I was going to score even above 6.5 just looking at the first few questions, but I looked at it again, and realized a lot of them were right up there. I guess several were also N/A. One thing that didn't ring true was that they're talkers and more extroverted. Yet, they say they are easily distracted and need to be alone to concentrate. The one I took for High Idea Flow gave you a "nonsense" scenario and gave you 5 minutes to write as much as you could about it. Also, at the the very beginning of the testing, they measured your writing speed by having you write a sentence over and over to see how fast you wrote. You really didn't know why they did this at the time. So, by combining your writing speed, plus how much you wrote, that's how they scored it. The ideas and thoughts didn't have to be practical, but you couldn't be repetitive or anything just to create output. So, I think what happened to me, I was able to write almost as fast as possible and keep thinking of things to write as I went. I remember I was flying. I can see where some people would go "blank" on the subject and have one or more pauses that would cause their output to go down. Anyhow, besides actually measuring your idea output, maybe the one I took had a more narrow scope on the concept of idea generation (maybe the only part they could measure), where Pfeffer's questionnaire is more broad.
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Postby Scenario Thinker » Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:21 am

Some snippets from Hank Pfeffer in the section ...
Hank Pfeffer wrote:Being Right About Being Wrong TMAs feel wrong a lot. Partly, TMAs feel wrong because of a high error rate. This is associated with operating in areas where they don't know what they are doing - the frontiers of their knowledge and understanding and at personal edges. TMAs, more than most folks, need to figure things out. They are pioneers, innovators, experimenters and explorers. They enjoy taking a shot at it - partly because they get endorphin rushes from figuring things out and also have a visceral confidence in their ability to cope. Empirical learners understand that error comes in many degree. On frontiers, things are not as simple as right and wrong. Learning what doesn't work aids in figuring out what does. Eliminating non-viable options is an important part of empiricism. The relevant questions are likely to take the form "What are the lowest risk (best) ways to proceed?"
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Reply

Postby paralegalgirl » Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:57 am

dlb.newage wrote:Suggestion: go to Google and enter TOO MANY APTITUDES. (I put that in capitals 'cuz it comes up differently with quotes). The person who wrote the article is writing about aptitudes but I think, to a large extent , they go together. This article made me feel a lot better when I found it. The author used to be a tester at a professional aptitude testing organization who then became more interested in the implications of the information than just testing people. DLB
Thank you for bringing this fascinating article to our attention. PLG
paralegalgirl
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 2523
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:24 am

Postby dlb.newage » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:00 pm

You're welcome! It's nice to know all this research I've done on my own is actually useful...( I thought so, but you know us scanners, often second-guessing ourselves..). I found something else of interest. Barbara may have read this book but somehow I missed it (published 1999); "Gifted Grownups" by M. K. Streznewski. I wouldn't be surprised if scanners were "gifted" (by definition NOT just high IQ). Her signs of gifted are: speed-curiousity-energy-sensitivity-perceptiveness-complex thinking-sees patterns, etc.....Sound familiar to anyone? And guess what the title of Chapter 7 is..."Bored, Bored, Bored: The Quest for Challenging Work"! Helpfully, she gives three elements which they/we need to find "right" work: 1)a day-to-day level of stimulation which provides challenge and newness, 2) to be able to communicate new ideas and to push ahead to new areas of work and learning as soon as the current area is exhausted and 3) to design his/her environment so that the first 2 needs can be satisfied. (Have to stop now-library computer running out of time...I'll be back). DLB
dlb.newage
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2000 11:01 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Postby dlb.newage » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:21 pm

Back again..to continue..Of course, knowing this in itself doesn't solve a lot but I'm going to take it and apply it to the careers I've considered and see what comes up. Although I just touched on it briefly earlier, speed (fast thinking/fast learning), to the author, is a classic sign of "giftedness"..and she has 30 years of working with smart people of all ages and backgrounds behind her so she knows of what she speaks, I believe! For me, I wonder if nonfiction writing and photography would offer the degree of challenge I need. (I've done both privately but not for publication. Maybe it would be different with more at stake?). I'm not sure exactly what WOULD be challenging for me at work. My last job was a challenge just to get through the day (heavy multitasking under time pressure in a pretty disorganized business) but I'd like to actually enjoy the work, not just my coworkers! Personal challenges included: driving cross-country solo at 22 after having first panic attack 6 months earlier, going to school in England for a semester not knowing anyone or having been overseas before (big deals for me, formerly very shy child).... These were emotional challenges about overcoming fear. I'm just not sure how to figure out other kinds of challenges, especially around creative work (and not just overcoming the fear of doing them). Any suggestions?
dlb.newage
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2000 11:01 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Reply

Postby paralegalgirl » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:40 pm

dlb.newage wrote:I'm just not sure how to figure out other kinds of challenges, especially around creative work (and not just overcoming the fear of doing them). Any suggestions?
Can I ask how old you are? Also, are you planning to make a career out of a creative field or are you currently working in a profession now? PLG
paralegalgirl
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 2523
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:24 am

Postby dlb.newage » Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:59 pm

I'm at the tender age of 49, living in semi-seasonal resort area. I'd like to have a creative job, but I'm willing to do it on the side. I just want to enjoy my work and be able to use my brain! I'm 50-50 introvert/extrovert so doing solo creative work p/t would be ok. I do like working with people but more 1:1 or 1:a few. The probable ideal would be working with people for about 30 hours a week and creative stuff for the rest. Since I'm lacking a strong "support system", I'd need people contact during part of the day to help me want to do solo work later (I get too restless to concentrate on creative work if I don't have SOME people interaction but f/t people contact is too much! Geez, does everything have to feel so complicated?!)
dlb.newage
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2000 11:01 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Postby dlb.newage » Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:08 pm

Oops! I forgot the work experience part. I've just done primarily small retail/food business work (the lifeblood of Cape Cod, for better or worse)and a stint at the library( not bad but really still customer service with books instead of gifts, food, etc.). My last job was food related hence the too-many-things-to-do under time pressure (and I'm an I/ENFP to boot...). I'll never do that work again but it was challenging, I liked using my timing/coordinating ability and miss most some fun times with coworkers in spite of the craziness. Most everyone I worked with was positive, with a sense of humor (well, coworkers--not so much management).I'd like to find a similar type of people environment but less hectic and not about food prep. DLB
dlb.newage
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2000 11:01 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Postby paralegalgirl » Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:25 pm

dlb.newage wrote:Oops! I forgot the work experience part.
Have you held jobs or had a profession in the past that you liked? PLG
paralegalgirl
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 2523
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:24 am

Postby dlb.newage » Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:25 pm

I've had jobs where I've liked certain parts of it, the schedule (I hate 9-5), what I learned at it (library), the people or some combination of the above. At my volunteer job today I did some editing which I liked. For one pre-Christmas season I worked at Sears Portait Studio ("Mc Photo" to me). I did it to see if I could be comfortable taking pix of people (as compared to landscape photography). I thought I'd like taking pix of babies and kids but it's such an unnatural environment for them that they have a hard time and so does everyone else. Surprisingly (to me), I worked well with a woman who had just turned 40 and was uncomfortable with getting older and two teenagers who were barely speaking to each other. I had them laughing and kind of teasing each other. Guess it goes to show we really need to get out there to try stuff and stop researching things to death!!
dlb.newage
Experienced Poster
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2000 11:01 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Postby Ikala » Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:29 pm

I simply had to point out the irony of the title "Too Many Aptitudes". I printed out this article and had it in my purse. The title was sticking out the top and as I picked up the bag I just saw it out of the corner of my eye and suddenly thought, now HOW can one complain about that!? It is almost just absurd enough to make me relax and say, hey, if my problem is having too many talents, I may as well lighten up. I've got it good. Sometimes I think it's just way too easy to find something wrong. (Hey- aren't TMA people likely to always feel wrong?). Anyway that made me feel better. Now I have to read the actual article.
I think it's because of the emphasis on the fact that you're OK the way you are, and really don't need to be fixed, you just need to discover what it is that's right for you, with some tools.
This is key, I think.
Ikala
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 340
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 10:01 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Refuse to Choose: The Forum for Scanners

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest