Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

What should you do when you want to do everything? If you're fascinated by everything, and you've been called dabbler, dilettante, undisciplined, indecisive etc., this forum is for you.

Moderators: Tituba, BarbaraSher

Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby SquarePeg » Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:07 pm

I'm pretty sure my daughter is a scanner.

She loves creative pursuits such as drawing, creative writing, playing music (first piano, then guitar). She enjoys English -- she enjoys reading immensely and aces all of her vocabulary tests because she's fascinated with words. She also enjoys Social Studies and has developed into a vegan, feminist who is interested in the spiritual practices of indigenous cultures. As well, she gets along wonderfully with young children and pets. She likes to dabble in other languages.

She's a sophomore. We attended her first college fair together. It was overwhelming to say the least.

How does she find out what her best options are so as to narrow down her choices? I know the school guidance counselor is supposed to have tools to help with this. But do they understand us Scanners? In the past, when asked what she wants to do, she'd say, "I want to be a tattoo artist," leaving the questioner with this narrow concept of her potential.

Are there schools at which you can design your own major? Is there a teenage version of "Refuse to Choose"?
SquarePeg
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1138
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby Scenario Thinker » Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:05 pm

Sounds a little like my sister (except for the creative stuff), who was an anthropology major and a graduate degree in Spanish studies/culture.

I remember even when I was in college, there was an option to design your own major.

Problem these days (maybe more for graduate school), the colleges cater to big business and what they want, not what the kids want. There's got to be some niche majors/degrees/schools if you Google around.
S.Thinker
....o
^/v
/>
User avatar
Scenario Thinker
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 7331
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 11:01 pm
Location: near Chicago

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby BarbaraSher » Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:24 pm

SquarePeg wrote:I'm pretty sure my daughter is a scanner.

She loves creative pursuits such as drawing, creative writing, playing music (first piano, then guitar). She enjoys English -- she enjoys reading immensely and aces all of her vocabulary tests because she's fascinated with words. She also enjoys Social Studies and has developed into a vegan, feminist who is interested in the spiritual practices of indigenous cultures. As well, she gets along wonderfully with young children and pets. She likes to dabble in other languages.

She's a sophomore. We attended her first college fair together. It was overwhelming to say the least.

How does she find out what her best options are so as to narrow down her choices? I know the school guidance counselor is supposed to have tools to help with this. But do they understand us Scanners? In the past, when asked what she wants to do, she'd say, "I want to be a tattoo artist," leaving the questioner with this narrow concept of her potential.

Are there schools at which you can design your own major? Is there a teenage version of "Refuse to Choose"?


Sounds like a great life. And most of these don't have to be careers, they can just be lifestyles. Example: I can't think of an animal I love more than dogs (and I have a thing for all animals), but I never put it on my list of potential careers. Not cooking, either. (Well, I don't really like cooking, but you get my point.) If she loves to make music, she should make music. Only she will know if she wants to think about it as a career. If not, she has something wonderful to do on weekends.


But in college she should read and read. And write, if she likes it. If she's a reader she'll learn so much (even if it's all fiction she reads), and if she likes to write she can write about the spiritual practices of indigenous cultures - and everything else.
BarbaraSher
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 6252
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 1999 10:01 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby SquarePeg » Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:46 pm

Thanks for your ideas -- very encouraging. The trick will be to make it seem like any advice I give her is from someone else.
SquarePeg
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1138
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby elizagard » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:15 am

Your daughter sounds a lot like me. I was an English major at UC berkeley. Career wise this turned out to be a good major as it is more generalist. Despite what many people think, English can be used for a variety of careers (or can be a stepping off point to graduate school). I considered careers in teaching, public relations, writing, and even business. I had no minor but have had drawing, graphic arts, piano, guitar, violin, photography, french, spanish, italian classes at various times throughout my life. UC santa cruz was also a possibility for me and offer lots of flexibility.

Although i considered getting a phd in english, I eventually decided that I did not love it enough for that. Studying literature at that time consisted of detecting the BS, weaknesses, and inconsitencies in other people's arguments (yes, in fiction). This is otherwise known as critical thinking skills. It has been invaluable for my work and life, but it left little time for pleasure reading and may other interests. Uc colleges are hard work if you want to get an A.

I started taking classes at a nearby community college (santa monica) while still in high school. Then i went part time off and on while working. Eventually, I completed the first two year requirements and transferred to berkeley. The timing of this may not be ideal from a parental perspective, but it had a few advantages. Class sizes were smaller. It was cheaper, and with grants and scholarships, I got out of university without a mountain of staggering debt that can be typical these days. I also was not ready for college immediately after high school. When I did go to berkeley, I wanted to be there. It was not just because others expected it.

Although I do not know your daughter, but "tatoo artist" sounds like the kind of answer I would give if I wanted to cut off any further questioning. She is only 15 or possibly 16 years old. At that age, 2 or 3 years feels like an eternity. Not only does she not need to decide on a career now, she does not need to decide where to go to college immediately.

Let her think about what she might want without pressure to decide. She can start thinking about if she wants a college that is close or far away? Does she want to start at community college and then transfer? Or would she prefer a four year college experience from the start? Does she think she might want a big city or small town or rural? Ask her if she would like to visit some nearby colleges and universities just to soak in the atmosphere. Again, no pressure. She might be able to sit in on some classes in topics that interest her. My experience with high school counselors was that they were useless. A counselor at a uni might be willing to talk to her even before she applies. Closer to the time she needs to apply, you can visit colleges that are farther away. A friend from mass recently came out to california to check out a few schools with her 17 or maybe 18 year old. Does she want to take a year off or so to work? If she decides to go out of state, working for a year there before college would avoid out of state tuition.
elizagard
Veteran Poster
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 456
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:22 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby SquarePeg » Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:29 pm

Thanks for your detailed reply, elizagard. You posed many great questions and offered lots of valuable advice.

It occurred to me that after you studied literature so thoroughly that it may be difficult for you to enjoy reading as much as you did. After I studied music, I became disinterested in some popular music, and I can't stand hearing the same song played daily. Also after I developed some critical thinking, "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy quickly lost its appeal.

When I was in HS, college seemed like a cavernous prison to me. So I attended a trade school for electronics, which I breezed through in nine months, and got a flexible job in the field. I was surrounded by brilliant engineers. So then I attended college part time for the equivalent of four semesters, before enrolling full time for engineering. I'd do it that way again, too. I did feel pressure to please others, and I'm glad I wasn't "forced" into a four-year program.

The one complication is that I'm trying to find a solution that will appease the mom, my wife, who is totally non-scanner-like. She would freak at such ideas as "Take a year off," or "Relocate to avoid out-of-state tuition fees" both of which seem very reasonable to me.
SquarePeg
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1138
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby skannie » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:49 am

Hi SquarePeg.

Here's a free webinar by Emilie Wapnick for you and any other parents of scanner/multipotentialite kids or teens. It's on March 6 2014. A recording will be made available afterwards for non-attendees to purchase.

How To Support Your Multipotentialite Child or Teen
http://puttylike.com/how-to-support-you ... n-march-6/
www.beyond-mountains.com
www.scannertribe.com
Scanner Tribe Group on Facebook
Scanner Tribe group on LinkedIn
Twitter - @scannertribe
skannie
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1050
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 3:25 am
Location: Slovakia

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby SquarePeg » Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:35 am

Thank you for this announcement!
SquarePeg
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1138
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby Elaine Glimme » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:38 pm

I LOVED college. It was one of the two best times in my life. (Raising my daughter was the other.)
Your daughter doesn't have to choose anything at fifteen. And she can change majors almost as often as she wants. If she's unsure about her major when she gets to college she can take the general requirements, and dip her toes (figuratively) in things that interest her until she finds something that works for her.

She's lucky to have parents whom she can talk to about college and a major. What does she say she wants?
If her answer is "I don't know," she could pick the ten colleges (or more) that interest her the most and the three of you could research them.
I think Lisa applied to twenty colleges, and out of those twenty, there were two that she wanted the most. She got accepted to both of them. We toured University of Colorado, and after seeing the campus, she decided "no way", and that was that.

Probably the best thing you can teach your daughter is how to go about making such an important decision.



If I ever want a tattoo, I'll look her up.
Last edited by Elaine Glimme on Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Elaine Glimme - author - "Temporary Address" and "The Molly Chronicles"
User avatar
Elaine Glimme
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 2809
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 1:00 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby Elaine Glimme » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:46 pm

SquarePeg wrote: The trick will be to make it seem like any advice I give her is from someone else.


Of course. She's growing up, and getting ready to make her own decisions.
That doesn't mean she can't listen to advice from Mom and Dad.

Sort of chokes you up, doesn't it?
Elaine Glimme - author - "Temporary Address" and "The Molly Chronicles"
User avatar
Elaine Glimme
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 2809
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 1:00 pm

Re: Teenage Scanners & Choosing a College

Postby SquarePeg » Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:56 pm

She's worried about money. That's what she hinted at today. I reassured her that we had the means to send her to college if that's what she wanted. As the webinar at Puttylike suggested, we'd be seeking an institution that's interdisciplinary or allows the student to "customize" his or her major.
SquarePeg
Mega Poster
Mega Poster
 
Posts: 1138
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm


Return to Refuse to Choose: The Forum for Scanners

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest