Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

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Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby resumeconfidence » Thu Sep 19, 2013 7:26 pm

Hello Scanners --

While many Scanners have at least some sort of part-time business (or several!), many of us also keep at least a part-time job, or sometimes return to the workforce for a season, or period of time, too. I know much of my story goes like this, at least, a self-diagnosed Scanner myself :)

Part of what I do is wear a hat as a professional resume writer. Because I can identify with this background & lifestyle, I do tend to attract clients that are, whether they know it or label themselves this way or not, are also Scanners! Mostly they are struggling with how to put together a resume that encompasses allll their skills, passions, and experience (hint: often you need 2 or more targeted to different types of work (and/or industries) and focuses on your related experiences/jobs while downplaying (or even omitting) those that don't support that particular goal)

ANYway, I am always looking for more examples and success stories from folks with these eclectic backgrounds to encourage and inspire others on our path. If you are so inclined, I'd love to hear them if you would be willing to share, specific to finding jobs, the kind of job(s) you do & why, etc. (not so much about biz ventures because my biz is helping job seekers :) ) Any use of your story would remain anonymous (say in a blog I write, or even sharing with a client) to protect your privacy, of course!

Either post them in the comments here if it's okay for me to use them this way (then we all can benefit, too!), or feel free to seek me out via my website (listed in my signature below)

Many thanks!

Shannon
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(and the list goes on . . . right, Scanners?)
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Let the beauty you love be what you do.” ~ Rumi
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby SquarePeg » Fri Sep 20, 2013 10:28 am

A friend of mine quit his full time job to hitchhike through Europe. While on the Metro, his backpack was stolen. He was in Germany and saw a help wanted ad from Apple Computer. They wanted customer service people who "must speak English." He said, "I speak English" and was hired. He worked there for a while and met the love of his life. They got married back in the USA.
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby resumeconfidence » Fri Sep 20, 2013 2:57 pm

Wow, SquarePeg! That IS quite a story! Sorta a movie script/dream of a lifetime story, isn't it? Thanks for sharing :)
Shannon
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Treehouse Lover/Yogini/International Cultural Explorer
(and the list goes on . . . right, Scanners?)
http://www.resumeconfidence.com
Let the beauty you love be what you do.” ~ Rumi
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby teachthem » Thu Nov 21, 2013 6:38 pm

After sending countless resumes, I finally got a job and it is a job where I could use my faculties and talents and I am very excited!

Before I sent my resume to this company(I had spoken with one of the partners first), I added additional skills, that I have, to let them know that I have skills that would benefit them.

Along with that, I also expressed what I felt from my heart, my excitement to be a part of their success goal in my e-mail.
When I got to the interview, I was met with three people. I just made a decision to just be my true self and at some point they offered me the job. It was a wonderful experience. I cannot wait to start!
[url]http://www.nancysungyun.com/[/url]
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great thread

Postby Lynx » Fri May 30, 2014 11:26 pm

Hi TeachThem, and thanks for sharing that. I'm just re-embarking on the resume/interview/offer journey again due to being laid-off. I'm checking in so this thread gets sent to my inbox.
"Vision is not enough. It must be combined with venture. It is not enough to stare up the steps; we must step up the stairs." Vaclav Havel
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby Elaine Glimme » Fri Jun 06, 2014 4:30 pm

Hi, Lynx,

It seems funny seeing your post somewhere other than "s steps per day".

When I had to look for a job, there was a program at the unemployment office (now called Employment development department) called "Experience Unlimited", and we, job hunters, provided all kinds of support to each other. The coordinator said that we all had a forty-hour per week job and that job was called "looking for work" and we should spend forty hours a week at it.

It was a very success-team type program. We helped each other with resumes and interviews. We looked for jobs for each other as well as ourselves. At that time, word of mouth was the most successful way to find a job, and my friend, Kay, found the flyer for the haz mat job which I got and loved and kept for twenty years. So friends and contacts - very important.

I wrote a different resume for each job I applied for. For University of California, you had to read the job description and, in your cover letter/resume you had to include every element that they said they wanted and show how you had had that experience. That's probably a good strategy for most companies.

I always researched the company and the position for which I applied - very important. It shows that you care about getting the job, that when you get hired you'll always be well prepared. And most important, you know which of your experiences to stress during the interview. Later, working for haz mat, I got to interview prospective applicants, and the ones who didn't really understand the job did not do well at the interviews.

Like anything else, my interviewing skills got better with practice. So an unsuccessful interview is still a step towards getting a job. Somewhere on the internet, l read about a man who interviewed at a company he wanted to work for, but for a position that he knew he wasn't suited for. And the he told the interviewer exactly that. "I'm not qualified for ________, but I am very good at ______, and if that opportunity comes up, please keep me in mind." (It worked.)

The rule of thumb back then was that job hunting took about one month for each $10,000 per year you expect to make.

I hope someone besides me posts here because job hunting has changed a lot since I had to do it. (The previous posts were all written in 2013.)

Happy steppin'! :D
Elaine Glimme - author - "Temporary Address" and "The Molly Chronicles"
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby SquarePeg » Tue Jun 10, 2014 2:22 pm

Elaine, this is all excellent job hunting advice! If we were on FB, I'd "Like" your post!

A job search duration of one month per $10K of salary is pretty distressing. I think it really means that you always have to be on the lookout for your next job!
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby Elaine Glimme » Fri Jun 13, 2014 12:44 pm

By today's standards, 10K per year per month of job searching seems pretty grim, but at the time it seemed grim but accurate. This was 25 years ago, and salaries were lower then. Also, it was a time when there weren't a lot of jobs to be had. It took me two to three months to get job-from-hell #2( about $25,000 per year.) and I got my haz mat job while I was working jfh#2. (40K.) What I took away from that statistic was that job hunting wasn't going to be easy and I had to stick with it and expect a lot of "no"s before I found something good.

Now, it's probably more like one month per $20,000 or $30,000 per year.
Last edited by Elaine Glimme on Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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No & Yes

Postby Lynx » Fri Jun 13, 2014 3:51 pm

Yes, the NOs work both directions as I find I have to withdraw my application sometimes when I get more in touch with myself or find out more about the position. Last week I withdrew from something way to close to my current work of which I am totally done with.

I also once stopped the process for a job in administration of a public school system. It happened when I thought about taking it I started shaking violently. I really needed work, but apparently my body didn't feel I needed it bad enough to take that job.

I managed to survive.

Then today, a job I missed the application for last week (had my letter and resume ready and it had been removed), reappeared today with the same job# and general description. Yes! you bet I got it all posted within the hour.
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"Vision is not enough. It must be combined with venture. It is not enough to stare up the steps; we must step up the stairs." Vaclav Havel
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby Elaine Glimme » Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:03 am

You're right about the "no"s working in both directions. Good vibes with the one you're going for.
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby emspace » Mon Jul 21, 2014 1:29 pm

Well, before I figured out how to make it work in my current job (now of 15 years), I had my résumé professionally written last year for a lot of money. It was rather disappointing because they sent me a questionnaire and made me write up the answers, and my writer ended up using almost all of my writing verbatim without changing much. I expected them to have some fancy way of making sure the right keywords were used and whatnot, but I guess I instinctively wrote my story in the language that is preferred. Had I known that, I probably wouldn’t have spent the money having someone else “shape” the résumé—another thing I could’ve easily done on my own, given I’m a graphic designer. :roll:

Anyway. Problem with the people I hired is that they insisted that I write the résumé specifically for a particular job. Which meant that I had to focus on stories that aligned with a job description I found (Product Owner) with a digital/web media company I felt I could work for. I am completely unqualified for that position, so in a way, I chose it as a test to see what the résumé writers would do with it. (But as I mentioned, I did all the thinking through and writing out of the experience that was related, so … they didn’t add much value overall.)

I’ve since come up with an idea for a creative résumé to better demonstrated what I offer and what I expect. I’ve mocked up a 7-spread board book (like the type made for babies) that I’d illustrate, describing a particular problem the company faced, how I took on many roles to solve it, and what the outcome was. In this way, I’d be able to show how my Scanner qualities were beneficial in a real world example. I think it works as a two-way filter, also: if they don’t like it or don’t think it’s “professional” enough for them, then it’s probably not the kind of creative out-of-the-box agency I want to be working for anyway.

***

I majored in Human Biology and Zoology, but after university, couldn’t see myself working in those fields. I’ve always wanted to be a NatGeo photographer (among other things), so I was advised to learn digital media and computer imaging. That put me into interactive multimedia, which is what I was hired for 15 years ago. But after barely a year of putting together workshop presentations, I switched into doing website work. That kept me interested for 5-6 years as I learned everything about web design, scripting, database design, site architecture, user experience, and on and on. Seriously, there’s no end to what you need to learn if you get into the web development business. There’s constantly new technology to get onboard with—or at least learn enough about to know if you should get onboard or not—and just when you think you’re getting a handle on a coding platform or language, another one appears that is better and faster and you must know it if you want to switch jobs…

OTOH, after about 10 years, it starts to feel like a roller coaster you can never get off of. I started getting bored about 5-6 years ago. Luckily, that’s when the digital video phase was hitting full force. So I switched into that.

But now basic video production/post-production is boring me, so I’m trying to find opportunities to do motion capture.

For Millenial Scanners, digital media is an easy choice if you want to constantly keep learning and developing new skills, and love being online most of the day.

Now into my 40s, I want to do less work in front of a computer, more work standing and moving around, using more far vision than near vision. Photography and filmmaking allow that, but only as long as there are other people to do the editing afterward.

The other super-lucky thing about being hired with this company is that this is an entrepreneurial one — that happens to coach other entrepreneurs. So we practice what we preach. And one of our core teachings is that everyone has a unique ability and when everyone on the team is allowed to work within their unique abilities (as much as possible—obviously not possible 100% of the time), productivity and creativity and value to clients increase exponentially. So “coming out” as a Scanner here was no big whoop. In fact, the people I’ve told are more than eager to let me be what I am.

As mentioned, I thought about switching into project management, but have to really ask myself if I’m cut out for all the meetings and negotiating and resource plotting and deadline watching and team energy management. The Scanner in me wants to see what it’s like, but the realist in me is pretty certain I couldn’t keep at it long.

I still want to make my boardbook résumé, just to see what kind of reaction it gets, but I’m less interested in another job…for now.

That’s my success example. :)
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David Laufer's Story

Postby Lynx » Mon Sep 29, 2014 7:50 pm

Hi y'all,

Just finished David Laufer's Ah Ha: Aha moments in a designer's career. [http://www.davidlaufer.com/]
At first I thought this would be series of journalistic interviews like Vanity Fair might publish, but it actually follows his career arc as he wrangles interviews with the heavy weights in the design world. Many tips I got by osmosis w/o Laufer spelling them out, or simply by observing his style:

    Do your homework. When you get an interview you need to know that person's work and career.
    Be prepared to be tested. Because Laufer is a designer he shlepped his portfolio to every interview until he had the stature where is rep preceded him. Some interviewers would ask about this font, or that color, etc. as a way to making sure it was his work, and he wasn't passing off someone else's as his own.
    Persist. When Laufer arrived in New York, he took the train from Jersey and plopped down in Phone Booth #6 and began to make his calls. Lots of no response, 'we're not hiring right now,' etc. and he would just go through his stack of cards, and then start again at the top.
    Cull your presentation to you best work.
    Each time you get a chance to show your work, make it better than the last time.
    Allow silence. Laufer doesn't call this out as a tip in the back of the book, but he often wrote about being in an interview and restraining himself from speaking while someone was looking over his work or pulling thoughts together to answer one of his questions.

Finally, a few gems:
"To be right is the most terrific personal state that nobody is interested in." Franz Kline
"You have an obligation to use yourself up. Don't die with a single good idea left in you left untried." George Nelson
"If you throw yourself into every project like it was a gold medal candidate, you will dash yourself to pieces. Opportunities for great design come along unexpectedly. Be alert—live for those projects." James Craig


Laufer also did something that now has a name: job sculpting. He was working for Oxford U press doing 'grunt' work, but decided that he would pitch in and pick up loose ends that otherwise the publisher would have to outsource. His boss noticed and began to hand off to him plum project.

It took a few pages before I got that he was essentially writing a memoir of sorts. After that I got into the fun of it.

Lynx
"Vision is not enough. It must be combined with venture. It is not enough to stare up the steps; we must step up the stairs." Vaclav Havel
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yet another designer quote

Postby Lynx » Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:37 pm

Another quote that Laufer drew from James Craig I forgot to add to my previous post:

If there was a recipe for an ideal design project it would read like this:
    • just enough time, but a definite deadline
    • A budget that give you a bit of running room
    • An encouraging client who trust your abilities
    • A subject that hooks your personal interest
    And—here is the important ingredient
    • A designer to observe that the right ingredients are all there.

Combine ingredients in an atmosphere of excitement and optimism, serve hot.

Lynx
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Re: Unique Job Search Success Stories Wanted

Postby Elaine Glimme » Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:05 pm

Lynx, that's great advice, and I know it's true both from when I was looking for work and later when I was the interviewer looking to hire people.

If you don't do work hard while you're job hunting, what guarantee is there that you'll work hard after you get the job. Learning all you can about your prospective employer is important. UC Berkeley used to have a special way you had to word your resume and your application. And at the county one of our interview questions was, "what do you think your average day will be like?"

As for silence, a friend of mine was treated badly at her former job. When she interviewed, she couldn't help going on and on about how badly she'd been treated. The interviewer didn't say anything, and she just kept going. Not a good idea. Silence can be golden.

I wish success to everyone looking for work, and I hope that you get a great job that makes you happy to get to work each day.
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trello as search tool

Postby Lynx » Fri Nov 21, 2014 3:36 pm

Hi everyone,

This came over my transom from Trello on how their online t-card system can be used for job hunting.

http://is.gd/qWDJp7

I'm a user/fan of Trello and currently job hunting, so I will get my chances to put it to good use as prospects heat up (rather cool at the moment.)

Lynx
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