Wishcraft Poster Child

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Wishcraft Poster Child

Postby KarenL » Fri Oct 29, 1999 3:44 pm

For years I've wanted to express in a public forum my delight at finding the Wishcraft book. Now I finally get to do it! I could be the Wishcraft poster child. I stumbled on the book in 1985 when I was very low, working at a good job that I HATED and desperately longing for the magic formula that would make me happy. I found it in that book. I followed the exercises, formed a small group, and within a few months I had quit that job and was earning money as a freelance writer. Three years after that I sold my first romance novel (my BIG goal). A couple of years after that I was supporting myself with my romances. This year I sold my 31st romance novel. Three years ago I got the bug to be a screenwriter, and I'm happy to report that I'm making steady progress in my new line of endeavor. I just signed an option agreement--no big bucks yet, but that's coming soon. Thanks, Barbara Sher and Wishcraft.
KarenL
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Postby Renee » Fri Oct 29, 1999 8:17 pm

This is so inspiring--I want to finish my time-travel romance novel and see it published. But I have been dragging my feet! I belong to a good group of writers, many of whom are published in romance, but 75% of them still have day jobs. One of my aims in writing is to make enough money so I don't have the day job! I hate going in to a workplace every day! I realize that the structure of a day job is supposed to HELP us artistic types schedule in writing time, but I'm not so sure that's true of me. My MAIN aim is to have lots of time to myself while still being able to make an OK living.I like LOTS of down time when I do very little. I guess I feel that putting in the year(s) of effort to write a book has to pay off with more than just a few bucks and my name on the book cover, although this is nice by itself, of course. So, KarenL, what kind of romances do you write? Do you have any advice for time-travel romance writers? Do you have any time for vegging out or traveling, or do you write constantly? About your screenwriting--break a leg! Go get 'em!
Renee
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Postby KarenL » Sun Oct 31, 1999 8:08 pm

Dear Renee-- I write category romance for Harlequin/Silhouette (and Loveswept, before they closed). I wrote one time-travel romance, which I came close to selling but didn't. If you want the highest-paying market, I would try Bantam. If you want the best chance of selling, try Berkley Time Passages or Leisure Lovespell. But first, of course, you have to FINISH THE BOOK. I know no way around the pesky business of having to sit your behind down in a chair and produce pages. I definitely don't write all the time. Maybe on average 2-3 hours a day. Currently, though, I'm spending a lot of time marketing my work (screenplays), which is more complicated than I would have guessed! I feel privileged that I've been able to make a living doing what I love. Most of the people I know who can support themselves with writing write for Harlequin, at least 3 books a year. Others have made it big with historicals or single-title contemporary, but that's much harder to do, especially when you're starting out. (I know, 'cause I've tried to break in to single-title contemp. Tough market!) If you aren't already a member of Romance Writers of America, join immediately. Best source of information. Do a search for their web site. I wish you the best of luck. Selling a book, or many books, is a dream many, many people accomplish, and you can too.
KarenL
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