How did you figure out what you wanted?

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How did you figure out what you wanted?

Postby BarbaraSher » Tue May 07, 2002 7:17 pm

For those of you who have found what you love, would you share with us the answers to any or all of these questions (and any I didn't think to ask that I should have)? QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? a) always knew b) by accident c) saw someone I admired doing it e) was told I would like it/be good at it f) changed my mind until I got it right g) other: QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? QUESTION 4: What obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? QUESTION 5: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? QUESTION 6: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? (Sorry, I just added a question and threw off the numbering system. Hey, nobody's perfect.) [This message has been edited by BarbaraSher (edited May 08, 2002).]
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Postby Eugene » Wed May 08, 2002 2:21 am

Yes , Yes , please tell us!!!! Image Maybe I can learn something that will help me to find my own way Image
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Postby ajpor » Wed May 08, 2002 6:52 am

I'll bite... QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? #### I always knew I wanted to write; I always *wrote* for that matter, even though I never pursued publication or considered myself a writer. I loved being read stories as a child, and when I learned to read, it was no jump to realize that I had learned to *write* as well. My mom has my first book, written, illustrated, and stapled by me when I was in second grade. Image QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. ###### Writing was for me, a hobby of sorts. I had penpals and wrote volumes each month. I and my friends, all literate types, wrote fan fiction for our favourite tv show and singing group. I wrote poetry, I wrote parody, I wrote skits for fun for my friends. But I never thought of myself as a writer, nor did I seek publication. I never considered what I wrote as suitable or good enough, just drivel I poured out for fun. That didn't change till I was much older: I am 48 now and my first book, co-authored, is going to be published the end of this month (EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!). The publisher is interested in other, individually-authored books from both me and my co-writer, so this seems to be the beginning. I have another work for which I am now doing production notes; I will be working to bring this one to animation. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? ###### I dismissed everyone's praise as being invalid, coming from friends/family/coworkers as it did, reasoning that b/c they loved me, they could hardly say, "Well, good grief, Jean, this is purely garbage! You're no writer!" I should perhaps have trusted them to tell me the truth; maybe I should have had the courage to believe that I *could* successfully write. However, I believe things happen at the right time in life, so I'm not particularly upset that things seem to be moving forward now instead of when I was 25. I was a different person at 25 and I'm rather glad that *that woman's* work isn't on record!! QUESTION 4: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? ####### Oy, what a question. Not much, actually. I'd have written more throughout my life instead of putting it aside for years at a time. I'd have moved forward on publishing my educational stuff and maybe kid lit. But certainly, I'm glad I was never in a position to have my spiritual/philosophical work taken seriously until now! QUESTION 5: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? ######## Image Easiest question in the world. Join a success team! While our book was already on the spring list when I had the opportunity to become part of a team forming in Toronto, I still regarded it as rather a fluke and myself as a hobby writer. Within a few short weeks, all that changed. I was encouraged to show my own work to someone who was in a position to know whether it was good enough to publish (and was floored to discover that it's actually suitable for animation as a feature). Through the self-work and the group and Joyanna's feedback, my entire self-perception grew until now I answer automatically, "Me? I'm a writer..." The books are tremendously helpful, and I love them and recommend them, but there is no substitute for another living human being--or several--listening and responding to you, giving you ideas and feedback, and welcoming yours. The process of watching each other take risks and face fears on our way to those long-awaited dreams is more powerful than I could have imagined. Exciting, fun, inspiring...and EFFECTIVE! jean
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Postby BarbaraSher » Wed May 08, 2002 9:04 am

Splendid!!! Thanks! That's just what I was looking for. I'll keep running back to look for more responses today. Thanks, Ajpor. Personal stories are fascinating to me (and probably everyone else!)
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Postby bikegirl » Wed May 08, 2002 12:15 pm

Hi!! Thought I’d answer this one QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? a) always knew I was one of those kids that exhibited artistic talent from day one. Loved to cartoon and in grade 6 had to do a paper on what I wanted to be when I grew up so I wrote about being a cartoonist and eventually became one. Some people are born with an obvious gift(s) so it was never a question for me. In high school the guidance counsellor tried to steer me into medicine (my chemistry marks were good) because she didn’t want me to be a “starving artist”. Thankfully I didn’t take that advice. QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. Well I went to art college and university and even though I was drawn to illustration I choose graphic design because I could make a relatively decent living at it. Luckily I landed jobs where I utilised my cartooning abilities (combining illustration with design) and have never been out of work. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? To listen to your heart and not to those around you who urge you to be practical and who discourage you from following your dreams. But I’m 41 and it took me til age 40 to realise that. I went into graphic design to please others and to avoid being a poor artist but now am longing to spend more time illustrating and painting (I also paint portraits). I’m currently considering options that may include a sabbatical or some way of allowing me more time to pursue my passions. I care less about material things now and more about happiness. I am aware of my mortality (age 40 does that to ya also) and want to make the most of my time here. QUESTION 4: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? I’d worry less about being poor (ironic as I’ve never been poor) and follow my heart and talents more. QUESTION 5: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? Follow your passions whatever they may be. Take chances. If you don’t know what you like to do then do many different things and something will turn up out of the blue that interests you. It’s amazing what can drop into your lap when you’re out there networking and just trying things out.
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Postby Christopher Kai » Wed May 08, 2002 12:48 pm

QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? Finding a career you love, is like finding your soulmate. Each relationship and job you have you learn in "practice" not in "theory" what you really love and hate to do, and what you feel passionate and dispassionate about. If you're in a relationship or a job you aren't happy with, if you have the courage to make the necessary changes, with self-reflection, courage, and persistence, you will find a career you love, and your soulmate. Persistence is a powerful predictor of success! QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. Since I was very unhappy at my day job, and having gone through about 10 different jobs, two years ago I decided to quit my day job, sell all my valuable possessions, and move to California [from New York City] to start a new life as a self-employed professional speaker and published author. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? I learned that when you have the courage to pursue your dreams, there is divine intervention at play. Within two weeks, I sold my valuable possessions, my car, and my apt. I signed my contract (to sell my place) on the day before I left (Friday.) On Sat. morning on the day I left, I get a call from United airlines saying that my connecting flight from NYC to Chicago to SF will be canceled due to Chicago crew problems. So instead of taking a connecting flight, they put me on a direct flight, FREE OF CHARGE. I also got the first part time job I applied for once I moved out to California. QUESTION 4: What obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? Obstacles? There's soo many! But obstacles are really strength builders. The obstacles I faced were being ostracized from my family and friends, blinding uncertainty, opportunity cost of leaving my cush corporate job, no real job, no real friends, no girlfriend, no income, living only on my savings. And when you decide to make bold steps, you will have everyone around you asking and probing you for answers, and it takes a lot of effort just to explain yourself to them. But I must say though, if you know what you want, why explain? QUESTION 5: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? Nothing. Victoria Holt once said, 'Never regret. When it's good, it's wonderful. If it's bad, it's experience.' I've gained a lot of experiences... QUESTION 6: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? When you are alone, away from everyone and everything, and you are one with your own thoughts and dreams, if you can answer these three questions wholeheartedly, them I believe you've found the career you love. The three career questions are: 1. What would you pursue if you had no fear?2. What would you pursue if you knew you had a terminal illness and you wouldn't be here in 5 years? 3. If you already were a millionaire, what would you choose? If you put mission before materialism, and purpose before profit, you'll find what you love if you have the courage to try. Good Luck everyone!
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Postby wandadenny » Wed May 08, 2002 12:57 pm

QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? I write and produce TV shows. I started out 10 years ago writing a novel! By "accident" - ten years ago I took a creative writing class. The class was too large for the instructor, so she split the class with her boyfriend. I got into his half of the class - by a one two count! He was an Emmy nominated screenwriter working on his PhD. I was writing my first novel. He kept saying my writing was so visual I should write a screenplay. I was very negative: little me! Like I could sell one! Waste of time! I was my worst enemy. I wasted 5 years before I even tried -- I was so sure I would fail. QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. I've always loved television and the movies. I took an acting class and got hooked on acting. Actors read scripts. I discovered scripts were simple to write. I bought a book and taught myself to write scripts in a weekend. I've acted for seven years - TV commercials, films, TV pilots, etc. I have an agent. I have an acting coach. I started this gig at age 48 years. I've been able to get big movie stars to read my stuff. I've written 6 screenplays. They didn't sell. I thought I failed. I'm a watercolor artist - I've painted over 30 years. I got hired on a major art restoration project. One contact led to another and now have the green light to write and produce a documentary about the restoration project. If I hadn't written 6 screenplays and acted for 7 years, I'd be lost. But I've studied hard and have confidence in my talent. And I ask for what I want. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? I was too intimidated by others' opinions to follow my dreams. also my dreams were buried at the risk of feeling silly and laughed at. We have to try a lot of things to find out what we want and don't want. And we have to take risks. A 50 year old woman starting an acting/writing/directing career...wanting to produce? No way. That's about half a percent of the population who make it, right? Age 50 is when women leave the biz! Don't listen to that garbage...follow your heart and have patience. Don't give up. And only talk to people who support your dreams. It's too easy to get de-railed by someone who's jealous. And shoot high! I enter the big screenwriting challenges -- Sundance, ShowTime. QUESTION 4: What obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? The biggest obstacle was learning to let go of a steady paycheck and learning to have faith the money would be there on a project-to-project basis. I've had to wear many short-term job hats. I stayed in corporate america 10 years too long for the paycheck. Other people thought I had a cool job. I was miserable. I had no clue life could be as great as it is now! I've never been happier...there's no price tag on happy. I thought of my career as dual for seven years; a day job with a creative hankering. At times I felt split in half. I'd work a day job and then go home to sit at the computer and write. It's hard work. It's lonely. There's a lot of rejection. QUESTION 5: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? I'd jump out there and go for a career in entertainment, regardless of what my friends said. Don't get stuck in credit card debt. Paying off debt slowed me down four years. Stay light. Live below my means. Drive a car I pay cash for...no big car note for a splashy car. I don't need four closets of new clothes. Have money in the bank. At least $1,000 for emergencies. Take excellent care of your health. Dreams come true - be healthy enough to enjoy your success. Eat light. No junk. QUESTION 6: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? Don't go it alone! I found a dynamic career coach. I had to re-wire my thinking to get out of the job/paycheck/security mode! Jobs are just the opposite - not secure. Look at the layoffs and downsizing. He had me write a life plan. Set goals. Where does work fit into my life? I had to get focused. I felt silly saying I wanted a job in TV, especially here where it's mostly banks and insurance companies. But you'll find someone who knows someone's neighbor's aunt and you'll make connections. I started networking with local TV people and SAYING what I wanted. "I want to write and produce TV shows." You've got to know what you want; you've got to tell people what you want...tell enough people and you can get hired - you can earn $$$ doing about anything you want. Hang out with people who are doing what you want...Hang with people who are more successful than you. And help someone just starting out. You've gotta give back. Next Sept I'll be out looking for work again! It's exciting. I can't wait to see what I land! I hope this note helps someone else set started. If you're miserable where you work, it's a blessing. WD
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Postby ChocoKitty » Wed May 08, 2002 2:16 pm

Oh, this is marvelous!! I love reading this stories -- they're so inspiring. Keep them coming!
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Postby MDG » Wed May 08, 2002 2:35 pm

Ditto!!!
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Postby Going for It » Wed May 08, 2002 5:12 pm

I find all these responses fascinating as well! Here are mine: Question 1 - How did you figure out what you wanted to do? Actually I did the exercises in Wishcraft about 20 years ago, and that was the start. Since then I did a a lot of work in self-development and reflection, but it was an exercise on Core Values from Awaken the Giant Within (Anthony Robbins) that made me see clearly what was most important to me. I always knew I wanted to write, but only in the last five years (I'm 49) did I discover that "encouraging and inspiring others" is what I consider my life purpose. Question 2 - Describe the path this took you on. I quit my corporate job about a month ago, and am starting a new career as motivational speaker and life coach. I have also started writing columns on personal growth. Question 3 - What did you learn? I'm always learning, but the things that struck me are: we all have internal guidance, if we get quiet and really listen. And we're all a lot more capable than we realize. Also you should test the water first, but at some point you have to jump in! Question 4 - what Obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? I had trouble accepting myself as a creative person, even after selling forty short stories and publishing my poetry worldwide. I didn't believe enough in myself or my dreams. Question 5 - What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? I'd like to say that I'd leave the workforce earlier but knowing how important financial stability is to me, I still think I made the right choice. Question 6 - What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? Once you have narrowed your search, find people in the same field so you can get feedback on your work. It took awhile but I now have very solid writer friends. We get each other's feedback on everything and all our work has improved tremendously. We have also been great motivators for each other. -- Going for It [This message has been edited by Going for It (edited May 08, 2002).]
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Postby katchal » Wed May 08, 2002 9:41 pm

QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? g) other: It never occurred to me that I would not build a career. My first job was putting invoices in alphabetical order at my grandparents' factory when I was four. I'm a fourth generation career woman, so I've been planning to work since I lovingly sewed uniforms for my dolls and pretended to send them to boarding school when I was nine. During a career crisis in college, I used the Wishcraft book and the exercises in What Color is Your Parachute to 1) analyze what kinds of projects I did for fun and 2) figure out how to transfer those skills to build a career QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. My father traveled all around the world selling data communications services. I grew very interested in international relations and at 10 decided to pursue a career with the foreign service. For the next 11 years, I studied for the Foreign Service exam, learned languages, studied abroad and even changed my major from International Business to History/Global Policy when Dean Rusk told a friend of mine that that was the best preparation for a diplomatic career. Everything changed my junior year of college. First, I actually met several people working in the US Consulate while I was studying in France. Their jobs looked REALLY boring. Then, a friend of mine got job at the US Embassy in Moscow. When she came home for the holidays and told me about her experience, I quickly realized that the fun policy jobs I wanted usually went to political appointees or people with PhDs and what my friend was doing sounded really boring too. Suddenly, I could see myself spending the next 30 years stamping visas in some horrible place like Bostwana. Meanwhile, my parents were seriously pressuring me to go to law school. My boyfriend was got accepted to a top law school, so I went to visit him and sat in on a few classes. It was SO boring that it made visa-stamping look like fun! Graduation was looming, so I sat down with the Wishcraft book (which I had purchased in high school in 1983) and What Color is Your Parachute and worked through every exercise. During high school and college I had been a dedicated resume-builder - I had a B average and had held leadership positions in a dozen campus organizations. When I analyzed my volunteer work, it screamed "Marketing." I wrote press releases, did media relations, organized events, wrote ads, managed hospitality, designed banners, edited and wrote articles, and really enjoyed stats class. Also, I loved science and computers, so I wanted to do high tech marketing. I got a summer job doing marketing, but when I graduated the recession was bad and I could not find a job, so I started a company with my brother and two years later went back to get an MBA. Finally, I was able to get a job with a telecom carrier and I have had fun doing high-tech marketing with ever-increasing levels of responsibility ever since. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? I learned that if you aggressively pursue what you love and work very hard to build skills and credentials in that area, you have a much better chance of finding opportunities and being able to take advantage of them when you do. QUESTION 4: What obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? I was so set on a single-minded goal, that I was not open to other opportunities that might have come my way. QUESTION 5: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? I wanted to leave my home in the rural South, which I hated and which offered no opportunity for someone who wanted to travel the world and do high tech marketing. Unfortunately, I let my mother intimidate me and so did not move to Silicon Valley or New York as I wanted to do. If I had it to do over, I would have been on a plane the day after graduation. That lack of courage set my career back by at least 5 years. QUESTION 6: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? 1) Seriously work through the exercises in Wishcraft and What Color is Your Parachute. Yeah, they're a pain and it's tempting to just gloss over them, but that's not going to help you. DO THE WORK! 2) Learn to do research and read everything! My family's motto is "I might be interested in _____. Let's go buy the book." When I was trying to get my first job in wireless, I read every book I could find about the industry and the technology. I subscribed to the industry trade journal and read the 10Ks for every company I could find listed in there. When I wanted to move to the Internet industry in 1995, I bought a book, learned to program Web pages, and started hanging out at Web conferences. 3) Work hard. I love marketing in the same way that a painter loves painting. If I didn't get paid to do it, I'd have to do it anyway. Even though I have special talents for marketing that make me a lot better than the average person in my field, I still have to work hard to build my skills and knowledge. Marketing divas have to train and practice just like opera divas. Just because you love something and have a talent for it doesn't mean its effortless. In the TV show "The Paper Chase," the main character is Hart, an ambitious first year law student. In one episode he asks the editor of the law review how he managed to succeed so well at their demanding school. The older student replied, "Work, Hart. Work every damned day." That's my advice: If you want to reach your dream, then get off your ass and work hard for it every single day. [This message has been edited by katchal (edited May 09, 2002).]
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Postby Vict » Wed May 08, 2002 11:21 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Christopher Kai: <B> Finding a career you love, is like finding your soulmate. Each relationship and job you have you learn in "practice" not in "theory" what you really love and hate to do, and what you feel passionate and dispassionate about. If you're in a relationship or a job you aren't happy with, if you have the courage to make the necessary changes, with self-reflection, courage, and persistence, you will find a career you love, and your soulmate. </B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE> WOW! That's a helluva first post! Welcome to the boards. ------------------ Bright Blessings -V
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Postby wandadenny » Thu May 09, 2002 6:36 am

These stories are GREAT!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks WD
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Postby CynthiaC » Thu May 09, 2002 8:32 am

Great thread! I hope nobody minds another reply from a writer. QUESTION 1: How did you figure out what you wanted to do? Hmm.. I had two very different experiences with this. I only came to identify myself as a writer in the last year. Reading and writing were things I took to even as a child. As a pre-schooler, I used to get up at 3:00am and go into the hallway with my books. I loved non-fiction books about everything: animals, geography, ancient egypt. I made up board games and told stories to my friends. By the time I was in Grade 6 (age 11-12) I'd written two long children's novels and was well into a third. I wrote the class play at age 10 and it was performed on cable TV. I didn't think there was anything remotely unusual about this. I started a journal when I was 14 and continue to keep a journal today. In the summers, before I had a job, I'd often go to the library daily and read 2 or 3 novels a day. My parents didn't discourage my writing, but they didn't encourage it either. I got put into dance lessons: tap, baton, jazz. I was a truly horrible dancer. I got put into music lessons: organ, piano, guitar. I didn't really have any talent there, either. I got put into sports: soccer, bowling, tennis, swimming. I was consistently the worst player on the team. I hated struggling to be mediocre. I wanted to shine. I wish some of that effort had gone toward encouraging my writing. When I was 17, I decided to become a print journalist. I did an internship at a local newspaper, enrolled in university and joined the staff at the university newspaper. I remember my parents being very concerned that I'd chosen a field with little financial security. They told me that I was unrealistic and that nobody could make a living as a writer and that I just had to get used to the idea that nobody likes their work but everyone has to do it. I used to argue with my father about this. I wanted to love my work. A year later, I went to a law library for the first time and had an epiphany. I was supposed to be a lawyer! I really related to Christopher's post likening the experience to finding a soul-mate. It was love at first sight for me and journalism was forgotten. So was writing. I went home and told my parents that I wanted to become a lawyer and there was much rejoicing. I didn't write anything for fifteen years, except my journal and long letters to friends. I just dropped it. My love affair with the law lasted 11 years. I never questioned my career choice. Then my Dad died suddenly and my grief almost pulled me under. I fell out of love with the law almost as quickly as I'd fallen into it and began to resent law for putting me through a horrible year after my father's death. At the same time, I was starting to hear an annoying inner voice that was telling me "wrong way, wrong way." It wouldn't shut up and it wouldn't stop. I knew what the right way was, but I was convinced that "nobody" makes a living as a writer. I'd starve. I signed up for a creative writing class and started work on a novel. It was a huge step. Then a childhood friend contacted me to say she'd heard about my Dad. She and her husband are freelance journalists and writers. They'd just returned from 2 years in Paris and had a book contract and a house and a comfortable lifestyle. "I can do that!" I thought, and all of a sudden, it was like I really could. I left law last fall to become a journalist & writer. I don't have a passionate love at first sight relationship with writing. It's more like coming home, it's just a part of me. Writing is how I respond to the world. QUESTION 2: Describe the path this took you on. Oops, already did, above. QUESTION 3: What did you learn? I shot myself down without even trying to be a journalist/writer because "everyone" said that you can't make a living that way. I didn't believe in myself. People told me I'd never become a lawyer either, but it didn't affect me the same way, maybe because it was something farther away from my heart? I had a bristling, "I'll show you!" reaction with law; with writing, I just meekly accepted what "they" said. Ironically, it was law that gave me the confidence to come back to writing. I'm still uncertain as to why I had such a profound love-at-first-sight feeling with law and why I fell out just as hard as I fell in. I used to tell people I'd marry the man who made me feel like law did (rather unnerving now, since I'm contemplating marriage). What the heck was it for? I felt powerfully driven to become a lawyer, like a calling. Then it disappeared. QUESTION 4: What obstacles stood in the way of discovering what you really loved? Discovering was not hard, but executing was. Last fall, I came across the old novels I'd written as a child and re-read bits of them. I was shocked to realize that I made my main character's father a writer whose best-selling novels had been made into movies. 25 years later, that's still what I want. Lack of confidence was probably the biggest obstacle. I didn't know any writers and didn't know what to do or how to learn or even meet any. (Then again, I didn't know any lawyers, either). Listening to what everyone else said I could or couldn't do. The belief that my dreams were impractical and childish and that when I grew up I had to put them away. QUESTION 5: What would you do differently if you had it to do over again? I struggle with whether I should have heeded that passionate feeling to become a lawyer. It was what felt right at the time and how can one argue with following the truth as one knows it? Or did I just manufacture something that would please my parents? I know if I'd put as many hours and as much hard work into journalism as I did into law, I'd be far along in a successful career instead of just starting out again at age 34. I don't know why I dropped writing almost completely, either. It wasn't a decision, really. I guess I thought of it as a childish habit that I needed to outgrow. And then law school and practice took up so much mental energy that there wasn't much left at the end of the day anyway. Why did I think that writing and law had to be mutually exclusive? I wish I'd not given up on journalism without trying. I wish I'd kept up with writing even while doing law. QUESTION 6: What advice would you give someone else searching for their wishes and dreams? If you have children, pay attention to what they love and excel at rather than putting them the usual childrens' activities whether they've expressed interest or not. (Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell recently reported that they're moving to Vancouver for a few years so their teenage son can participate in hockey at the highest possible level. "It's our job to help him achieve his dreams," Hawn said. Wow.) Do a Myers-Briggs test and see whether the sorts of occupations you love are suited to your personality. I was so into law I don't think I would have paid any attention to discouragement, but when I finally did do this test, it EXACTLY predicted the things that would eventually drive me from practicing law. High on the list of ideal occupations for someone of my type? Journalist, editor and writer. Don't let anyone tell you that "nobody succeeds as a...." or "you can't make any money doing..." I'd sooner try and fail than listen to that again. We can and should love our work, or at least have work that gives us the time, money and ability to pursue what we love. What we love is in us, it's been there all along. And unfortunately, my Dad taught me that life is way too short to leave your dreams for retirement. He only got 18 months of retirement. After I left law, I asked my mother what my Dad would have done if he could have done anything. "Sail," she said. I was shocked - I'd never even heard my father mention sailing. She told me when they were first married, he decided to build a sailboat and worked for months building one from plans. He paid a month's salary for a cedar mast, but when it was close to being finished, he stopped working on it. My mother used to get after him to go to the neighbour's shed where he stored it and finish it. He used to get angry. He stopped paying rent on the shed and the rent piled up. My mother suggested he put the boat in the yard. He refused. Eventually, the neighbour's son was doing target practice on the side of the shed and shot my father's sailboat - and his dream - literally full of holes. He never launched it, not even once. My writing is like my father's boat, and I was just as paralyzed to give it to myself as he was. I don't know why we're so terrified of getting what we want. I have a photo of my Dad while he was visiting me. He took a harbour cruise all by himself - in the photo, he's at the wheel of a two masted sailing ship and he's grinning like crazy. I want that. Cynthia
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Postby Annie B » Thu May 09, 2002 10:30 am

Wow Cynthia. You ARE a terrific writer. I have tears in my eyes. Good Luck to you!
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