reading audio books

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reading audio books

Postby pittsburghgirlinmemphis » Thu Sep 04, 2003 2:21 pm

Hi everyone, I just began reading for a library radio station. what I read is taped and airs later for those who are visually impaired. I absolutely love it! I would love to be a professional reader, like audio books, or commercials, something like that because I would love to be able to make a living doing this. I can't find anything out about this. Does anyone know how to get started or who even records such books and things. I know a lot of movie stars do, but I'm just a regular girl! Can anyone help?
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Postby Tituba » Thu Sep 04, 2003 5:53 pm

Here is some info on voice over work http://www.actorschecklist.com/resources/voice.html There are useful links at the bottom of this site
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Postby AVATC » Fri Sep 05, 2003 2:21 pm

Hi, PittsburghGirlInMemphis! Since I\'m a voice actor who just finished my first commercial audiobook and am recording my second ( Image ), I can tell you that plenty of work is around for us regular girls -- IF you\'re willing to hustle to get it! Rather than re-write things I\'ve written previously, I hope you won\'t mind if I direct you to some other links, all presented for what it\'s worth: * Since so many people have asked me how to get started in voice-overs, I created anadvice page on my web site. * After people read my advice, they then asked for recommendations on books, so I added a books page with links to Amazon so you can read full descriptions of the books and order if you choose. * I recently answered a similar question on a message board frequented by voice actors. That message board (http://www.voiceartist.com) is a terrific resource for anyone interested in voice-overs as pros with all levels of experience post there. * Here\'s my post about my first audiobook from a couple of weeks ago in the Success Stories forum. I hope this info is helpful to you. Good luck! ------------------ Karen Commins www.AVOICEAboveTheCrowd.com [This message has been edited by AVATC (edited September 05, 2003).]
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Postby pittsburghgirlinmemphis » Fri Sep 05, 2003 6:55 pm

AVATC, Thank you for your absolutely positive reply! I am so excited and I loved your web page. Can't wait to return to it and gather more info, from you book recommendations. I decided yesterday to take a continuing ed. acting class and thought it strange you had mentioned it on your web page. WOW!! Congrats on your success!! I enjoyed the passion you conveyed in your post about your first audio book. Much success to you in pursuing your dream!! With gracious thanks, PittsburghgirlinMemphis.
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Postby AVATC » Fri Sep 05, 2003 7:46 pm

Wow, PittsburghGirl! If I wasn\'t excited before, I sure would be now after reading your bubbly reply! Thanks so very much for your nice message. I really appreciate your good wishes and definitely send all the same and more back to you! Congratulations on taking the step of signing up for the classes. Every step you take is one step closer to the realization of your heart\'s desire! Please keep us posted on your dream, and don\'t hesitate to contact me if you want to talk shop. Image ------------------ Karen Commins http://www.AVOICEAboveTheCrowd.com
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Postby Franlie Allen » Mon Sep 08, 2003 10:30 am

Thanks to both of you! This is also my dream to one day be able to give up my day job and work exclusively on voice acting! It\'s good to hear from other women with a similar dream. I would like to know if either of you have children and how you juggle a full-time job (with a rather inflexible schedule), with family responsibilities, volunteer work, and trying to find time to market yourself or get to auditions? How flexible are the people with whom you found work? I would LOVE to record audio books at home but, can\'t afford the equipment investment right now...any ideas? I also find it difficult finding Canadian industry information and contacts...help with self-marketing ideas be appreciated. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AVATC: <B>Wow, PittsburghGirl! If I wasn\'t excited before, I sure would be now after reading your bubbly reply! Thanks so very much for your nice message. I really appreciate your good wishes and definitely send all the same and more back to you! Congratulations on taking the step of signing up for the classes. Every step you take is one step closer to the realization of your heart\'s desire! Please keep us posted on your dream, and don\'t hesitate to contact me if you want to talk shop. :) </B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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Postby pittsburghgirlinmemphis » Mon Sep 08, 2003 11:22 am

Hi Franlie, I do not have children and thanks to s downsizing, I do not have a full-time job. My husband does commercial photography and we are trying to build a business. Right now my first step is going to be taking the acting class which includes voice development and I just checked out AVATC's book recommendation, Alice Whitfield's, Take it from the Top, today when I went to the library to read. As my dream moves forward, I will keep you posted on my moves, maybe we'll find success together. Do you live in Canada?
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Postby AVATC » Mon Sep 08, 2003 4:38 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: Thanks to both of you! This is also my dream to one day be able to give up my day job and work exclusively on voice acting! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Yours and mine too! Image <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: It's good to hear from other women with a similar dream. I would like to know if either of you have children and how you juggle a full-time job (with a rather inflexible schedule), with family responsibilities, volunteer work, and trying to find time to market yourself or get to auditions? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I don't have children, but I do have a day job. I work as a computer network specialist for the government from 7:00am-4:30pm most days and have every other Wednesday off. I have to get up at 5:15am to get to the day job, and I often don't get to bed until close to midnight. I cherish those Wednesdays off as I use them to work on marketing, etc. I feel like I'm a double agent. I can't tell the day job people too much about voice-over because they will think I'm not doing my job. I can't tell the v-o people about the day job because they might think I'm not serious about v-o, I don't need the money, I'm not available, etc. I have been on my day job for almost 25 years (gasp!), and I have a lot of vacation time that I can use for auditions and jobs. However, I have done about 98% of all my auditions and jobs from my studio. My agents send scripts by email, and I record them and send back .mp3s for the clients to evaluate. I have to press every spare moment into service. I stay at my day job as a conscious choice I am making to fulfill my dreams rather than forced labor. I choose to be there because I like to travel and buy things. When I reach my 25 years of service, I will be eligible for early retirement IF AND WHEN they offer it to me. I am far from being of retirement age. Even when my v-o wages meet or exceed that of my day job, I expect that I will continue to do both until I can retire. I would like to be able to retire from the government because then I would get a monthly annuity and be eligible for health insurance coverage for the rest of my life! Obviously, I'm hoping for that early-out in the next few years. My voice-over work is picking up everyday due to my constant, persistent efforts and positive attitude. I make phone calls and send emails to former and potential clients while at lunch or on break at the day job. On weekday evening and on weekends, I have done all of the following things and then some, in no particular order: record and transmit auditions from my agents or potential clients burn copies of my demo CDs print the CDs, jewel case trays and jackets assemble the CDs write letters and package demos for mailing record, edit and transmit work from clients (including the audiobooks!) update my web site design my next mail-out update my client database research companies and send more query and follow-up emails and letters read the voiceartist.com messages send press releases study French so I can be multi-lingual research legalese and write responses on a trademark dispute research, buy, install and configure equipment practice reads and record demos experiment with my sound editing software I previously volunteered for 2 professional groups. With 19-hour days being routine for me, something had to go, and the volunteer gigs were first. Unfortunately, my other life's passion, playing my harp, has also taken a back seat to voice-over. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: How flexible are the people with whom you found work? I would LOVE to record audio books at home but, can't afford the equipment investment right now...any ideas?.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> The audiobook publisher I'm currently working with has been very accommodating with my schedule and has not given me a firm deadline on either book. My agents will send auditions with a very tight turn-around. Sometimes they need them before I get home from the day job, so I have to pass. Usually, they will ask for them by the next day. Producers for narrations have a little more flexibility, but it all depends on the due date established by the client. Actually, I would LOVE to record audiobooks in someone else's studio....or, at least using my new ISDN transceiver (that I have yet to get operational -- see to-do list above!). Audiobooks do not pay well, especially when compared to the incredible amount of time they require. The publishers usually pay PER RECORDED HOUR. It may take me 20 hours (or more) in the booth to actually record 10 finished hours. Recording at my studio means that I also have to spend another 15-20 hours editing the audio (to get to that 10 finished hours number) so that all mistakes are removed, I have the take I want in the event of a flub and the read is fluid. Once the recording is done, I then have to spend real-time (in this case, 10 hours) to transfer the recording to DATs to send to the publisher. If I recorded in someone else's studio, I would get a much greater return on a much shorter period of time. The project could be done in days instead of months. A few ideas to get experience (you may even want to volunteer for the right opportunity): Work at a radio or TV (including cable and colleges) station Read for the blind or visually-impaired Work at a recording studio PRACTICE everything aloud and record into a tape or minidisc recorder A few ideas to save money if you want a studio: eBay -- You wouldn't BELIEVE how much money you can raise by liquidating assets on eBay, especially if you have collectible things! Bank your raises. I have been doing this for several years, and the cumulative effect is astounding. Every 2 weeks, I get paid, and I have an allotment that comes straight off the top of my check into a savings account that money bankrolls my equipment purchases. Save your spare change. If something costs $1.01, ALWAYS pay with $2, and NEVER spend that .99. Saving your spare change is an incredibly easy way to save money because it truly is money you will never miss. Again, it adds up very quickly. Make a decision everytime you have discretionary money to spend. Do I want this CD for $15, or would I rather have that $15 for my equipment? <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: I also find it difficult finding Canadian industry information and contacts...help with self-marketing ideas be appreciated.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Where in Canada are you? The Audiofile Reference Guide lists some Canadian audiobook publishers. Do you have a Yellow Pages-type phone book there that lists businesses by category? I also had some links for national organizations on the advice page of my web site, to which I referred in my earlier reply. As for self-marketing, I think my own to-do list above will give you some ideas. I love marketing! I've read some great books that are chock full of great ideas. I particularly like Self Promotion for the Creative Person by Lee Silber and 1001 Ways to Market Your Services by Rick Crandall. I have links to these and others on my web site if you want to take a look at them. I apologize for the extreme length of this post. Obviously, voice-over is my passion, and I get wound up about it! I don't pretend to know everything; in fact, I often feel like such a newbie compared to other people. I just offer this information humbly and for what it's worth. I'll be glad to discuss more if you want! Image ------------------ Karen Commins www.AVOICEAboveTheCrowd.com [This message has been edited by AVATC (edited September 08, 2003).]
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Postby Franlie Allen » Fri Sep 12, 2003 10:12 am

Wow! Thank you so much for all the valuable and encouraging information. I really does sound as though I need my own equipment or at least access to some recording equipment. I work a 4-day week and get every Wednesday off. I spend half that day recording digital audio books for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind in Toronto. The other few hours I spend running errands: doctor's, dentist's, volunteering at daughter's school, etc. I live in Guelph, Ontario about an hour or so from downtown Toronto (depending on traffic). I'm also about 1-1/2 hours from Buffalo, NY and 3 hours from Detroit. While I have dual Canadian and US citizenship, I would prefer to remain in Canada. You have truly inspired me to get myself better organized: priorities for my time and money, so that I can get marketing myself and saving toward purchasing the equipment I need to work from home in the evenings (and keep my day job for financial security and benefits). Selling myself is the scariest part...and has me at a loss where to start. I've read lots of books but, keep procrastinating. I guess I keep remember my dread of sales cold calls when I tried a sales career years ago. I would like to keep in touch. I welcome your enthusiasm and experience! Thanks, again!
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Postby AVATC » Fri Sep 12, 2003 2:20 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: Wow! Thank you so much for all the valuable and encouraging information. I really does sound as though I need my own equipment or at least access to some recording equipment.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> It really does help to have your own equipment for practice and demo production, if nothing else. This has been my path, but your mileage may vary. Image <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: I work a 4-day week and get every Wednesday off. I spend half that day recording digital audio books for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind in Toronto. The other few hours I spend running errands: doctor\'s, dentist\'s, volunteering at daughter\'s school, etc.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Aren\'t Wednesdays off absolutely GREAT?! People thought I was crazy to take Wednesday when 99.9% of the people want Monday or Friday. I really envy you that you have them off every week. Recording for the blind is terrific preparatory experience. I got so busy between the day job and my real life in voice-overs that I had to give up the volunteer gig of reading for the blind. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: I live in Guelph, Ontario about an hour or so from downtown Toronto (depending on traffic). I\'m also about 1-1/2 hours from Buffalo, NY and 3 hours from Detroit. While I have dual Canadian and US citizenship, I would prefer to remain in Canada.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Here are a few sources from the Audiofile Audiobook Reference Guide that be geographically close to you (no guarantees either expressed or implied!): Canadian Broadcasting Company (85 titles) nmachan1@cogenco.ca 905.339.3640 www.cbc.ca c/o Radio Licensing POB 500 Station A Toronto, ON Canada M5W 1E6 The Children\'s Group (20 titles) www.childrensgroup.com rrogers@childrensgroup.com 800.668.0242 1400 Bayly St., Ste. 7 Pickering, ON Canada L1W 3R2 Isis Publishing (1400 titles) and Louis Braille Audio (150 titles) sales@ulverscroftusa.com www.ulverscroft.com POB 1230 West Seneca, NY 14224-1230 (I think this is near Buffalo?) Olivia & Hill Press (200 titles) order@oliviahill.com www.oliviahill.com 734.663.0235 905 Olivia Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48197 800.955.9659 Scenario Productions (28 titles) admin@scenarioproductions.com contact Mark Bornstein www.scenarioproductions.com 877.625.5379 418 Westmoreland Ave., N Toronto, ON Canada M6H 3A7 National Broadcast Reading Service, Inc. (275 titles) nbrs@canada.com contact Robert Trimbee www.nbrscanada.com 816.422.1161 150 Laird Dr. Annex Toronto, ON Canada M4G 3V7 <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: You have truly inspired me to get myself better organized: priorities for my time and money, so that I can get marketing myself and saving toward purchasing the equipment I need to work from home in the evenings (and keep my day job for financial security and benefits).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I\'m glad that I could help you. As evidenced by all of the posts on these boards, it\'s amazing what can happen in your life when you can clearly define your goals. As long as you keep taking steps on your goal everyday -- no matter how small -- you will be moving in a forward direction and will eventually get where you want to go! <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: Selling myself is the scariest part...and has me at a loss where to start. I\'ve read lots of books but, keep procrastinating. I guess I keep remember my dread of sales cold calls when I tried a sales career years ago.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I know EXACTLY how you feel about making calls! You know that making that phone call is the first step on your incredible journey. When I decided to become a voice-over actor, I was perpetually excited when making my demo. I then hit a brick wall when it came to making phone calls to market it. What good does a fab demo do me if I can\'t make myself call people who not only might be interested in hearing it but actually willing and able to hire me? The thing that propelled me to make the first call was the following passage that I read in Jay Crandall\'s book 1001 Ways to Market Your Services...Even If You Hate to Sell\": <I>Overcoming Your Cold-Calling Fears Cold calling scares all of us sometime. Ram Yellen deals with his fears by asking himself these questions: -- What\'s the worst thing that can happen if I make this call or proposal, or ask for a referral? (They can say no, no, a thousand times no! --or is that from a Victorian soap opera?) -- What\'s the best thing that could happen? (You could make a new, lifelong friend.) -- What would I do if I knew that this person needed my services tomorrow? -- Pin up a picture of someone successful in your business and ask yourself what he or she would do in this situation. (If it\'s a competitor, you can do it just to show them up!) -- Acknowledge the fear and do it anyway. </I> The bit about the Victorian soap opera cracked me up. Even now, I still have times when I feel fear or anxiety about making calls to pursue my voice-over career. I think about the \"1000 times no\" line, and it gives me courage (after I stop laughing!) to make the call. Also, I think it makes a huge difference whether you are calling to market yourself or something/someone else. I have been told countless times that I should work for an ad agency because my direct mail pieces are very clever. However, it\'s soooo much easier to market ME than it ever would be to do it for someone else! I only have to please ME. If I like my idea, I don\'t have to worry about anybody else liking it. I don\'t have to follow anybody else\'s script. I also found a couple of books specifically on cold calling that have been helpful. I have links to them and Jay Crandall\'s book on my web site. If Jay Crandall\'s quote doesn\'t give you courage, perhaps this one from my idol and mentor Barry Manilow will: <I><B>I believe that we are who we choose to be. Nobody is going to come and save you. You\'ve got to save yourself. Nobody is going to give you anything. You\'ve got to go out and fight for it. Nobody knows what you want except you, and nobody will be as sorry as you if you don\'t get it. So don\'t give up your dreams.</B></I> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: I would like to keep in touch. I welcome your enthusiasm and experience!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Like I said before, I am still learning and growing in this career -- I hope I always will be! I happened to read a magazine article the other night written by Pat Conroy that contained a quote I loved because it summed up how I sometimes have felt in this transition: I was a baitfish struggling upstream with the leaping wild salmon, but I was swimming in the same river and happy to be there. I\'m always happy to talk shop whenever you want. Good luck! ------------------ Karen Commins http://www.AVOICEAboveTheCrowd.com
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Postby Franlie Allen » Mon Sep 15, 2003 9:56 am

Thank you for the encouragement and the great contacts and book recommendations. I will definitely check them out. Just as you said, I was SO excited to finally get my demo done (although I'm still questioning whether I should make changes...but, that could just be me procrastinating, too). I'm afraid to make those phone calls (and not really sure where to begin). I guess I'll just have to DO IT! [This message has been edited by Franlie Allen (edited September 15, 2003).]
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Postby AVATC » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:29 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: <I>Thank you for the encouragement and the great contacts and book recommendations. I will definitely check them out. </I><HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I\'m glad I can help. Besides, it\'s good karma for me if I was helpful to you. I believe that what you put out in the Universe comes back to you. Image I\'d be interested to know what kind of response you get from those publishers. The Audiofile Audiobook Reference Guide has lots of other publishers listed in it, but I only picked out the ones that I thought might be geographically close to you. Certainly let me know when you land a book so I can celebrate with you! <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franlie Allen: <I>Just as you said, I was SO excited to finally get my demo done (although I\'m still questioning whether I should make changes...but, that could just be me procrastinating, too). I\'m afraid to make those phone calls (and not really sure where to begin). I guess I\'ll just have to DO IT! </I><HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Is your demo strictly for audiobooks, or is it commercials and/or narration? I ask because you will want to have a different demo for each type of potential client. Why are you questioning if you should make changes? When you say you are not really sure where to begin with the calls, are you saying: a) you don\'t know whom to call b) you don\'t know what to say c) all of the above If these are the types of issues you are facing, I am sure you would feel more confident if you had a script. I loved the book Cold Calling for Women by Wendy Weiss. She takes you through each step of the process, including developing your sales benefits, qualifying your prospects, writing the script, dealing with call screeners and/or voice mail and following up. I have 4 talent agents (with 2 other agents associated with 1 of them). The agents don\'t do any marketing for me, and they don\'t even deal with the audiobook market. The bottom line is that if you want to work in audiobooks, you\'ll have to do the leg work to dig up the work....at least until you become one of those celebrity narrators that we both deserve to be! Image I\'ll be looking forward to a continuation of this discussion, either here or through e-mail, whenever you get the chance! ------------------ Karen Commins http://www.AVOICEAboveTheCrowd.com
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Postby pittsburghgirlinmemphis » Mon Sep 15, 2003 7:56 pm

Hi Karen and Franlie, I took my first acting class on Saturday! And get this, the teacher said "I'll be bringing someone in about the fifth class or so. He is moving his production company from Virginia to here. He mainly does, voiceovers,if anyone is interested in that, and he might be looking for new talent." I could've fallen over!! I'm thinking how this all came about, reading at the library, my first post on the boards with Karen's super fast terrific, helpful (I could go on) response AND I JUST finished Alice Whitfield's book the day before the class!!! How strange is all of that!!! I'm so EXCITED!! Good luck to both of you! I hope you keep moving FORWARD!!!
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Postby Franlie Allen » Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:11 am

Sorry for being so verbose but, I'm really warring with myself at the moment and doing a lot of second-guessing....and procrastinating. I keep telling myself I need to be better: do more research, more classes, etc., before moving forward. (I've done some acting and voice classes, as well as acting on-stage in a local little theatre production.) While I know I should have different demos for each type of work, mine is commercials but, a little longer clips to give a flavour for narration (theoretically). That's part of my unease, the second is whether it has enough variety to truly reflect my abilities. (By the way, yours sounded great.) I keep asking myself whether I should go do another demo for animation voices and a third for narration and also, whether I should have done it with a professional actor/producer, who taught a introductory voice over class and voice over class for animation that I took. He's about $700 for one demo versus the $400 I paid from a local voice over actor/musician with is own home recording studio. (Expense is an issue). I did send the demo out to about 20 people for their comments (one with a background as an ad. exec. who used to hire voice talents and one a professional actor and a few musicians), with mostly positive feedback but, some felt some changes would better reflect my talents but, largely they felt the demo was good enough to send to agents, who would let me know if changes were required. So, I'm not sure whether this is just fear/resistance putting up road blocks or genuine concern that I wouldn't be putting my best representation of my talents out there. Also, much of the voice work available is in Toronto or Markham and I've pretty much been told it all goes to Union members only and I will need an agent. So, as far as marketing myself...it's definitely choice "C" All of the above (along with a big dose of fear of rejection, fear of having my dreams dissolve). I'm feeling very apprehensive about approaching agents or prospective clients. It's difficult to market myself when I just keep seeing the negatives: inexperienced, inflexible schedule, non-union, and out-of-town, no home-studio. So, I'm hoping I can be a little fish in a little pond rather than a minnow in the big pond. So, I'm hoping to find work locally. I would really enjoy voicing some interactive CDs (computer games, or educational software), industrial projects or other animation but, I don't feel confident enough to do an animation demo yet. I think more acting classes are probably in order (or is that just more hiding?). Should I just read the marketing books and get out there and do it? Were the books helpful with ideas about targetting your efforts (including less obvious ones), selecting prospective end-users for your talents as well as concrete step-by-step guidance on selling yourself? <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AVATC: <B> Is your demo strictly for audiobooks, or is it commercials and/or narration? I ask because you will want to have a different demo for each type of potential client. Why are you questioning if you should make changes? When you say you are not really sure where to begin with the calls, are you saying: a) you don't know whom to call b) you don't know what to say c) all of the above If these are the types of issues you are facing, I am sure you would feel more confident if you had a script. I loved the book Cold Calling for Women</B> by Wendy Weiss. She takes you through each step of the process, including developing your sales benefits, qualifying your prospects, writing the script, dealing with call screeners and/or voice mail and following up. I have 4 talent agents (with 2 other agents associated with 1 of them). The agents don't do any marketing for me, and they don't even deal with the audiobook market. The bottom line is that if you want to work in audiobooks, you'll have to do the leg work to dig up the work....at least until you become one of those celebrity narrators that we both deserve to be! Image I'll be looking forward to a continuation of this discussion, either here or through e-mail, whenever you get the chance! Thanks again for your time! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> [This message has been edited by Franlie Allen (edited September 16, 2003).] [This message has been edited by Franlie Allen (edited September 16, 2003).] [This message has been edited by Franlie Allen (edited September 16, 2003).]
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Postby Franlie Allen » Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:23 am

I remember that feeling! You go girl! Keep moving toward your dream (and enjoy the journey). :-) <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by pittsburghgirlinmemphis: <B>Hi Karen and Franlie, I took my first acting class on Saturday! And get this, the teacher said \"I\'ll be bringing someone in about the fifth class or so. He is moving his production company from Virginia to here. He mainly does, voiceovers,if anyone is interested in that, and he might be looking for new talent.\" I could\'ve fallen over!! I\'m thinking how this all came about, reading at the library, my first post on the boards with Karen\'s super fast terrific, helpful (I could go on) response AND I JUST finished Alice Whitfield\'s book the day before the class!!! How strange is all of that!!! I\'m so EXCITED!! Good luck to both of you! I hope you keep moving FORWARD!!! </B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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